What's On

From: Thu 15 March 2018
To: Sun 6 May 2018

New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, 53 New Walk, Leicester LE1 7EA



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Radar has invited artist Mike Cooter to actively engage with New Walk Museum’s collection, taking inspiration from the work of Polish artist and theatre maker Tadeusz Kantor, whose work was concerned with the role and status of the object. The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe, will draw on Kantor’s Anti-Exhibition (1963) and Leicester-born naturalist Henry Walter Bates’ (1825 -92) research into a form of mimicry that would take his name. Working across holdings from fine art, natural history, industrial design, decorative arts and material cultures, the exhibition will look to explore how the objects in the collection both perform and reproduce themselves through their own agency and in symbiotic relationship with organisations that host them.

Kantor has been extensively researched by Dr Dan Watt, Senior Lecturer in Drama, Loughborough University. The exhibition is part of a wider programme, entitled ‘The Object is Alive’, that has invited artists to develop new exhibitions in response to the work of Kantor and their own interest in the agency of the object. The exhibition will be accompanied by a major symposium on the influence of Kantor taking place at Loughborough University on the 28th April 2018.

Private View

Thursday 15th March, 5.30pm-7.30pm
New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, 53 New Walk, Leicester LE1 7EA
With drinks reception and opening by Leicester City Councillor Piara Singh Clair. 
Please RSVP to: tony.spittle@leicester.gov.uk by Monday 12th March.

Thu 22 March 2018

Cope Auditorium



Ben Whishaw (Brutus) - Julius Caesar at the Bridge Theatre - Photo credit Manuel Harlan.jpg

Ben Whishaw (The Danish Girl, Skyfall, Hamlet) and Michelle Fairley (Fortitude, Game of Thrones) play Brutus and Cassius, David Calder (The Lost City of Z, The Hatton Garden Job) plays Caesar and David Morrissey (The Missing, Hangmen, The Walking Dead) is Mark Antony. Broadcast live from The Bridge Theatre, London.

Caesar returns in triumph to Rome and the people pour out of their homes to celebrate. Alarmed by the autocrat’s popularity, the educated élite conspire to bring him down. After his assassination, civil war erupts on the streets of the capital.

Nicholas Hytner’s production will thrust the audience into the street party that greets Caesar’s return, the congress that witnesses his murder, the rally that assembles for his funeral and the chaos that explodes in its wake. 

(New Certificate 15 - was 12A)

(Please note that Julius Caesar will contain strobe lighting)


Wed 18 April 2018

Martin Hall


£16.50 / £5 students

Maddy Prior  - Smaller file.jpg

Over the course of her remarkable career, Maddy Prior has made it her mission to work with some of the most exceptional musicians in the world – both within Steeleye Span and beyond. To that noted list she has added accordion player, singer and clog dancer Hannah James and multi-instrumentalist Giles Lewin (Bellowhead / Carnival Band), forming a trio that explores the music of England, the British Isles and Eastern Europe. Debut album 3 For Joy took fourteenth century poems, tales of the industrial revolution from Ulster and music from the Southern Baptist Church tradition, while their latest Shortwinger is themed on the wild field, mainly concerned with birds, hares and their place in folk mythology.

The trio will be performing songs from both albums as well as highlights from Maddy’s solo and band career – all presented in a daring acoustic style that enhances one of the finest voices this country has ever produced.

Thu 19 April 2018

Martin Hall Theatre, Loughborough University


Free / Just turn up

Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills.jpg

There are a myriad of forces at work that prevent, enable and force movement. Borders prevent freedom of movement between states. Police and private security regulate movement through social space. Social housing tenants are forcibly relocated as areas are gentrified. Such issues disproportionately affect black people. Yet being made to move is not always a negative phenomenon; and a number of black musicians and artists have explored the role that music can play in creating times and spaces of collective empowerment to subvert, resist and overcome these power structures.

Through performance and discussion, this event will explore the relationships between blackness, music, and the (in)ability to move. What is the relationship between grime and social housing? What does it mean when songs can cross borders but people can’t? How might music work within, against, and beyond a world in which free movement is denied to so many?

With Evan Ifekoya, Xana, Majd Alsaif, Richard Bramwell and James Esson.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills

Thu 26 April 2018

Cope Auditorium


Free / Just turn up


Vikki will give a talk about ways in which different artworks can be installed in different places. She will share examples of best practice including how to plan and prepare for such work.  In this talk Vikki will share her own professional experience as well as examples from others. This session is designed for students but all are welcome.

Vikki Jessop currently works in the Department of Ancient Egypt & Sudan at the British Museum. After finishing her A-Levels, Vikki’s career in the arts began by volunteering in galleries and museums across Birmingham and Liverpool, she then undertook an apprenticeship at Ikon, Birmingham.

Following this she moved to London to work at Whitechapel Gallery with Rachel Whiteread on her permanent site-specific commission for the building.

Vikki then joined the V&A’s technical services team, whilst still working part Whitechapel Gallery as a Duty Manager and installation technician. Within a year of being at the V&A, Vikki was appointed Head Technician for the Disobedient Objects exhibition which opened in 2014. Alongside work at the V&A, Vikki has also freelanced for several galleries across the UK and also worked on mount- making for Banksy’s 2015 Dismaland project.



Sat 28 April 2018

Martin Hall


Free / Just turn up

Mike Cooter Exhibition.jpg

The work of the Polish artist and director, Tadeusz Kantor, frequently challenged the nature of the object, whether through surreal détournement of the function of a thing, or the bizarre fusion of the performer and the object into a hybrid, struggling identity, striving for new forms of expression, Kantor was haunted by the idea of the possible ‘liveness’ of materials.

This symposium aims to respond to the work of contemporary artists, commissioned by Radar, who are also responding to Kantor, through particular relationships to things, sites, museums and galleries. How might Kantor’s culturally specific ‘poor object’ find itself transformed across decades into a new Europe and a new media age?

Including guest speakers on Kantor and contemporary art practice and panel discussions on objects, Kantor’s history and performance practices (from actors, artists and academics), the symposium offers an opportunity to discuss the legacy of Kantor and the impact of object-based practice today.

Wed 9 May 2018

Martin Hall


£15 / £10 conc. / £5 students

Robin Ince - spring 2017 photo Timothy Ginn.jpg

Lakin McCarthy presents Robin Ince - Pragmatic Insanity.

Robin is the winner of a Sony Gold and Rose d'Or for the Infinite Monkey Cage and the Time Out Outstanding Contribution to Comedy, as well as The Francis Crick Science Journalism Award and 3 Chortle awards.

Robin's first new stand up show in three years is a clash of the two cultures, a joyous romp through his favourite artists and strangest scientific ideas. From the work of Stanley Spencer to Niels Bohr, it is 90 minutes fizzing with ideas about creativity in science and art, as well as asking why we believe we see what we see, and why we believe what we believe.

Robin will have just finished a 70 date, record breaking tour with Brian Cox that concludes at Wembley Arena. 

Age 14+

(Image: Timothy Ginn)

Thu 10 May 2018

Cope Auditorium



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The ruined aftermath of a bloody civil war. Ruthlessly fighting to survive, the Macbeths are propelled towards the crown by forces of elemental darkness.

Shakespeare’s most intense and terrifying tragedy, directed by Rufus Norris (The Threepenny Opera, London Road), will see Rory Kinnear (Young Marx, Othello) and Anne-Marie Duff (Oil, Suffragette) return to the National Theatre to play Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

(New Certificate 15 - was 12A)


Wed 16 May 2018

Cope Auditorium


£7 / £5 students


Following its 'global musical tour' in December, the University Choir will settle much closer to home in May with a programme of English music, including Gilbert and Sullivan's one act comic opera Trial by Jury - silence in court! Will justice be done? Will love prevail?

Wed 30 May 2018

Cope Auditorium


£13 / £10 conc. / £5 students


A live screening of Sergei Eisenstein’s 1925 silent masterpiece with a live, specially curated soundtrack.

Sergei Eisenstein’s 1925 silent masterpiece, Battleship Potemkin, is both one of the most influential films in history and one of the most controversial. Despite being hailed as amongst the greatest movies ever made, it has been banned on numerous occasions in countries around the world due to its propagandist convictions and potential to influence political thought.

Originally written as a revolutionary propaganda film, Battleship Potemkin is a dramatic retelling of a notorious mutiny in 1905, when the Potemkin’s crew rebelled against their officers. Eisenstein hoped the film would be given a new soundtrack every 20 years to help retain its relevance for each passing generation.

For this screening, Matthew Trusler (violin) and Ashley Wass (piano) have curated a powerful soundtrack of music by several different composers, many of whom were influenced and affected by the Russian Revolution of 1917. Works by Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Mussorgsky, Janacek and Bartok have been selected to complement the film’s narrative, and are skilfully timed to correspond with each change of scene.

The juxtaposition of one of the 20th Century’s most powerful films with a live soundtrack from some of the greatest composers associated with this turbulent era of political upheaval, makes for a truly compelling experience.

Repertoire included in the Potemkin soundtrack:

Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition

Bartok - Out of Doors

Prokofiev - Violin Sonata No. 1

Prokofiev - Violin Sonata No. 2

Janacek - Violin Sonata

Shostakovich - Prelude and Fugue in E minor

Shostakovich - Prelude and Fugue in D minor




Matthew Trusler

Matthew Trusler has developed a reputation as one of Britain’s leading violinists, performing with many of the world’s great orchestras, and receiving huge critical acclaim for his diverse recordings. Trusler has been invited to perform as a recitalist and concerto soloist throughout Europe, Australia, the USA, Japan and South Africa, with orchestras including the BBC Symphony, BBC Scottish and BBC Welsh orchestras, the Philharmonia, London Philharmonic, Royal Philharmonic, CBSO, Halle and Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. Further afield he has appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, NDR Hanover, Helsinki Philharmonic, Deutsche Symphony Berlin, Malaysian Philharmonic and Johannesburg Philharmonic.

Ashley Wass

Described as an ‘endlessly fascinating artist’, Ashley Wass is firmly established as one of the leading performers of his generation. Increasingly in demand on the international stage, Ashley has performed at many of the world’s finest concert halls including Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall, Concertgebouw and the Vienna Konzerthaus. He has performed as soloist with numerous leading ensembles, including all of the BBC orchestras, the Philharmonia, Orchestre National de Lille, Vienna Chamber Orchestra, Hong Kong Philharmonic, RLPO, CBSO, Bournemouth Symphony and under the baton of conductors such as Simon Rattle, Osmo Vanska, Donald Runnicles, Ilan Volkov and Vassily Sinaisky.


Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK


01509 222 948