At the moment there are no events planned for Radar, but watch this space to keep up to date. Below you can find information on events we've organised in the past.


Archived Events

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November 2018

'Co-working with Things': Exhibition Preview

November 2018

'Co-working with Things': Exhibition Preview

Join us for the opening of Assunta Ruocco's 'Co-Working with Things' in the Martin Hall Exhibition Space on Wednesday 14th November, from 4-6pm. Wine and refreshments provided, and the artist and curator will be present to discuss the work.

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Join us for the opening of Assunta Ruocco's 'Co-Working with Things' in the Martin Hall Exhibition Space on Wednesday 14th November, from 4-6pm. Wine and refreshments provided, and the artist and curator will be present to discuss the work.

An exhibition of artistic research conducted as part of the practice-based PhD project ‘Co-working with Things. How Furnished Spaces Contribute to the Emergence of Artworks’, supervised by Gillian Whiteley and­­­­ Eleanor Morgan, within Loughborough University School of the Arts, English and Drama. All prints were produced within SAED Printmaking Workshop with the help and advice of printmaking tutor Pete Dobson. Exhibition curated by David Bell, with support from Radar­.  

Background:

In 1947, artist Anni Albers urged us to consider ‘materials as our co-workers’. In so doing she invited us to develop new relationships with machines, tools, materials and working spaces. This exhibition explores how the things with which artists work can be seen as co-workers. All the artworks presented are based on simple sets of rules derived from what was possible within a particular, contingent context: working at home or in the printmaking workshop. The works are ongoing, and insist on labour intensive relationships with materials, tools and machines arranged within particular furnished spaces.


The most important aspect common to the works is that they are not autonomous pieces produced by an autonomous artist: their dependence on situations, contexts, equipment, and the willingness of others to do some of the work is written within the ‘code’ that structures their ongoing development. The modular installation Vertical Studio is formless, until someone helps to make it by arranging the elements. Aquatint Etchings is a series of double-sided, multi-layered prints: exhibiting them always involves outsourcing the process of deciding which print is visible, and which is concealed. To make the Photo-Etchings, I asked friends to select from thousands of drawings. Those chosen were then turned into a multiple through the complex photo-etching process which produces uncontrollable variations.

The myth of artistic autonomy is challenged by artworks that depend on contingent contexts and can only emerge from specific arrangements of things. Focusing on the role of things within furnished spaces also reveals the importance of maintenance activities that are not usually seen as part of artistic labour. It is the work of setting up and looking after spaces such as homes, studios and workshops that makes the emergence of new artworks possible.

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November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk (Cancelled)

November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk (Cancelled)

This event has been cancelled

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This talk accompanies the audio visualation at the Carillon in Queens Park, Loughborough. 

Sam Belinfante’s audiovisual work considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing. Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay which touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. It documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration.

If you would like to attend the installation event you can find out more HERE

External Link

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October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

An audio-visual installation at Loughborough's Carillon by artist Sam Belinfante as part of Radar's (re)composition project.

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Sat 27 & Sun 28 October, 11am-4pm
Fri 2, Sat 3 and Sun 4 November, 11am-4pm

Artist talk: Fri 2 November, 12.30pm
FREE - no booking required

Recorded in Loughborough’s Carillon over the course of a weekend, Sam Belinfante’s audio-visual installation considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing; a resonant issue for thinking through and about sound as a medium. 

Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay that touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. The work documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration. 

Installed in the ground floor of the Carillon tower, in a space ordinarily used to display objects from the Carillon Museum collection, the film celebrates small acts of care while reflecting on the impossibility of reversing material entropy. Whilst the Carillon is an enduring musical symbol of Loughborough, Belinfante’s approach eschews more obvious explorations of identity for a quiet meditation on the caring processes that are integral to all musical performances, instruments and the maintenance of a place’s identity. Sound, curation and performance intertwine in a struggle of preservation and de-composition. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Photo: Sam Belinfante at the Carillon, credit Benjamin Warner

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October 2018

Designing for Climate Futures

October 2018

Designing for Climate Futures

This conversation brings together three practitioners to explore what roles design might play in collective responses to climate change

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This conversation brings together three practitioners to explore what roles design might play in collective responses to climate change. Taking in a variety of methods, approaches and forms of design - from permaculture to architectural design; from transition design to design fictions - it will explore design as a tool for collective organisation. What can design do in the here-and-now of our warming world? What might design do in a more ecologically just world? And how might it help us get from here to there?

There'll be plenty of chance for the audience to ask questions and there will be free refreshments and snacks.

PANELLISTS

JOANNA BOEHNERT is an environmental communicator, designer and educator. She’s a Lecturer in Design and the Creative Industries at Loughborough University and is the founding director of EcoLabs, a studio visualising complex environmental issues. Her book Design, Ecology, Politics: Towards the Ecocene was published by Bloomsbury earlier this year, and has been praised as ‘a must-read for everyone interested in design, ecology, communication and politics.’
https://ecolabsblog.com/

ANNE MARIE-CULHANE is an artist whose work across a number of forms seeks to catalyse collective organisation to reduce the harm being inflicted on the planet, to increase understanding of our place in the world, and to bring to life positive visions now and for the future. She works closely with the University’s Sustainability team as the founder of Fruit Routes, a project that saw the planting of fruit, nut trees and edible plants along footpaths and cycle paths across the university campus. It creates a spring snowfall of blossom and an autumnal abundance of fresh fruits and berries for harvesting, foraging, eating and distributing.
https://www.amculhane.co.uk/

BIANCA ELZENBAUMER combines design research methods with critical approaches to education, conflict mediation and DIY making to explore how designers can contribute to create ecologically and socially just economies. Together with Fabio Franz she founded ‘Brave New Alps’, who have instigated a number of acclaimed projects that instigate, as well as explore, alternative ways of organising our lives. These have involved collaborative working with refugees, workers’ rights groups, artists and place-based communities. Bianca is also a lecturer at Leeds Art University. http://www.brave-new-alps.com/

The conversation will be chaired by DAVID BELL, Radar’s Programme Co-Ordinator. He is also a member of Out of the Woods, a writing collective exploring the forms of sociality and struggle required to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.

This event is part of the annual Fruit Routes Harvest programme, organised by the Sustainability team at Loughborough University. Across the 19th and 20th of October there are a number of events taking place on campus. For more information please visit http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/sustainability/biodiversity/fruit-route/.

Book Tickets

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October 2018

Fruit Routes walk with Anne Marie-Culhane

October 2018

Fruit Routes walk with Anne Marie-Culhane

You are invited to join Anne-Marie Culhane for an informal conversation as we walk around the University's Fruit Route. This is a chance to share thoughts on some of the themes and ideas that motivate and inspire Fruit Routes.

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You are invited to join Anne-Marie Culhane with Bianca Elzenbaumer and Joanna Boehnert to walk around the University's Fruit Route (approx 1km) from 4.30-5.30pm. This is a chance to share thoughts on some of the themes and ideas that motivate and inspire us within the context of Fruit Routes.

Meeting at the Barefoot Orchard, (the weather station opposite Pilkington Library) at 4.30pm. All are welcome; the route has flat paths (though not tarmac) and is wheelchair accessible. This is followed by a panel discussion by the three artist/designers 'Designing Climate Futures' hosted by Radar. For those who would like to come to the panel discussion we will go on to Martin Hall after the walk, where free refreshments will be provided. See below for more information and booking link.


FRUIT ROUTES is an award-winning project to create an edible campus at Loughborough University through planting of fruit and nut trees, foraging edible plants, and co-creative an edible food culture with students, staff and local people.

ANNE MARIE-CULHANE is an artist whose work across a number of forms seeks to catalyse collective organisation to reduce the harm being inflicted on the planet, to increase understanding of our place in the world, and to bring to life positive visions now and for the future. She works closely with the University’s Sustainability team as the founder of Fruit Routes.
https://www.amculhane.co.uk/

Designing Climate Futures is a discussion event exploring the role of design in movements for ecological justice within and beyond our warming world: https://www.facebook.com/events/297320200856502/

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June 2018

Disturbing Space by Xana

June 2018

Disturbing Space by Xana

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Disturbing Space is a radio station and sound system on a custom bicycle which answers to no body, place or time. The bicycle, "Soon Reach" was developed by sound artist Xana in response to a series of workshops in Loughborough, Leicester and London around the themes of connecting through sound, displaced geographies and building free spaces to manifest joy.

Disturbing Space reflects on the power of pirate radio, textile printing and songs about movement, lullabies, rhymes and tales which elevate Black voices; creating a journey that is chosen by the traveller and fuelled by music.

"Soon Reach" will be pedalled through Loughborough and passers by are invited to meet with the station and contribute to the broadcast, which can be listened to live on the day, here.

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Deparment of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

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June 2018

Making it up: This moment of June by Rebecca Lee

June 2018

Making it up: This moment of June by Rebecca Lee

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Book here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/rebecca-lee-making-it-up-this-moment-of-june-tickets-46146922688?aff=es2

Drawing on academic research from across the Social Sciences at Loughborough, Making it up: this moment of June, investigates forms and relations of listening that (re)produce and are (re)produced by personal and public places, thinking through non-musical, musical and technological listening. Rebecca has brought together an ensemble of Loughborough musicians to explore ways to trace boundaries of music, place and registers of listening. The public are invited to a recording session, when a recording of a new performance score will be captured. The audio recorded during that session will then play again in online and public spaces on our Loughborough Campus and in the town over the summer period. The score developed for the project will be published in autumn 2018.

This event is part of (re)composition, a project commissioned by Radar, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University’s Department of Geography. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Book Tickets

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May 2018

Re-Imagining Citizenship

May 2018

Re-Imagining Citizenship

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An exhibition collectively curated by the Politicized Practice/Anarchist/Theatre and Performance Research Groups at Loughborough University.

In government parlance, being a citizen means to be recognised as a ‘subject or national’. What is at stake in re-imagining new forms of citizenship and modes of civic participation? How can the notion of citizenship – in our trans/post-national society – be reconfigured without subjection?

This exhibition centres on the concept of the citizen-artist/artist-citizen to explore the potential for art practices to re-imagine citizenship. It brings together a range of audio-visual and text-based responses with contributions by artists and researchers from across and beyond the University. It includes artworks produced by staff and students at the Institut Supérieur des Beaux-Arts of Besançon (France) with whom the Politicized Practice/Anarchist Research Groups and the Theatre and Performance Research Group has an ongoing dialogue around themes related to art, performance and political activisms. The exhibition will feature items from the Working Class Movement Library, Salford archive collection.

Exhibition dates: Thu 31 May – Sat 14 July (Mon-Fri only)
Exhibition times: 12pm-2pm weekdays only during the Arts Festival (6-15 June) and by appointment at other times. To make an appointment please email luarts@lboro.ac.uk or telephone 01509 222948.

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April 2018

**POSTPONED** Symposium - Kantor and his influence

April 2018

**POSTPONED** Symposium - Kantor and his influence

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***PLEASE  NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED***

Due to unforeseen circumstances we have had to postpone this event until later in the year. Please keep checking our website for announcements on a new date. We are sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment caused.

The work of the Polish artist and director, Tadeusz Kantor, frequently challenged the nature of the object, whether through surreal détournement of the function of a thing, or the bizarre fusion of the performer and the object into a hybrid, struggling identity, striving for new forms of expression, Kantor was haunted by the idea of the possible ‘liveness’ of materials.

This symposium aims to respond to the work of contemporary artists, commissioned by Radar, who are also responding to Kantor, through particular relationships to things, sites, museums and galleries. How might Kantor’s culturally specific ‘poor object’ find itself transformed across decades into a new Europe and a new media age?

Including guest speakers on Kantor and contemporary art practice and panel discussions on objects, Kantor’s history and performance practices (from actors, artists and academics), the symposium offers an opportunity to discuss the legacy of Kantor and the impact of object-based practice today.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Dan Watt, Loughborough
Dan Watt is Programme Director for Drama at Loughborough University. He gained his PhD from Sussex in 2003, where his thesis explored fragmentary writing in the work of Maurice Blanchot, Samuel Beckett and J.M. Coetzee. He joined Loughborough in 2006. His research interests include philosophical and literary influences on theatre and performance in the twentieth century, specifically in the work of Tadeusz Kantor, and his research includes investigating the nature of abject objects.

Dr Richard Allen, Worcester
Richard Allen is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at the University of Worcester. He graduated from Wimbledon College of Art with an MA in Visual Performance (2008) and a PhD in Performance Practice from Aberystwyth University (2014). His work investigates the agency and theatricality of objects through the making of performances, films, essays and publications, including writings about the bio-objects of Kantor.

Noel Witts, Professor of Performing Arts
Noel Witts was born in Swansea and did a degree in English at the University of Leeds, where his theatrical interest started. For the last 10 years he has been busy developing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the Performing Arts at a variety of UK universities. He has developed international contacts for young theatre practitioners in Poland, Romania, Armenia, and other European countries and is interested in the theatre of Kantor.

Dr Klara Kemp-Welch, Courtauld Institute
Klara Kemp-Welch is Lecturer in 20th-century Modernism at the Courtauld Institute. Klara Kemp-Welch was educated at University College London and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (BA French and Art History, 1999; MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, 2001; PhD History of Art, 2008). She has published writings about Kantor, and her next book, Networking the Bloc: International Relations and Experimental Art in Eastern Europe 1968-1989, will be published in 2018.

Dr Martin Leach, DMU
Martin Leech is Senior Lecturer in Dance at DMU. Martin’s first degree was in English and Drama at the University of Hull. After graduation he won a Polish Government scholarship to study theatre directing in Poland from 1982–1983. He recently successfully completed his PhD thesis, a philosophical study of Kantor: ‘Even the thing I am …’: Tadeusz Kantor and the Poetics of Being.

Mike Cooter, Artist
Artist Mike Cooter  has  lectured  widely,  written  on  the  history  of  exhibitions  and  recently  completed a PhD at Goldsmiths, London. His current exhibition The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe at New Walk Walk Museum, Leicester (commissioned by Radar) explores the role of objects through the Museum's collection and is inspired by Kantor's work. His work investigates  the  structural  agency  of  objects,  be  they  sculpture,  cinematic  props or other anthropological artefacts - objects co-opted or created to drive narratives, fictional or otherwise.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

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April 2018

Talk - Vikki Jessop

April 2018

Talk - Vikki Jessop

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Vikki will give a talk about ways in which different artworks can be installed in different places. She will share examples of best practice including how to plan and prepare for such work.  In this talk Vikki will share her own professional experience as well as examples from others. This session is designed for students but all are welcome.

Vikki Jessop currently works in the Department of Ancient Egypt & Sudan at the British Museum. After finishing her A-Levels, Vikki’s career in the arts began by volunteering in galleries and museums across Birmingham and Liverpool, she then undertook an apprenticeship at Ikon, Birmingham.

Following this she moved to London to work at Whitechapel Gallery with Rachel Whiteread on her permanent site-specific commission for the building.

Vikki then joined the V&A’s technical services team, whilst still working at Whitechapel Gallery as a Duty Manager and installation technician. Within a year of being at the V&A, Vikki was appointed Head Technician for the Disobedient Objects exhibition which opened in 2014. Alongside work at the V&A, Vikki has also freelanced for several galleries across the UK and also worked on mount- making for Banksy’s 2015 Dismaland project.

 

 

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April 2018

Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

April 2018

Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

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BOOK FREE TICKET

With Evan Ifekoya, Xana, Majd Alsaif, Richard Bramwell and James Esson.

There are a myriad of forces at work that prevent, enable and force movement. Borders prevent freedom of movement between states. Police and private security regulate movement through social space. Social housing tenants are forcibly relocated as areas are gentrified. Such issues disproportionately affect black people. Yet being made to move is not always a negative phenomenon; and a number of black musicians and artists have explored the role that music can play in creating times and spaces of collective empowerment to subvert, resist and overcome these power structures.

Through live performance and discussion, this event will explore the relationships between blackness, music, and the (in)ability to move. What is the relationship between grime and social housing? What does it mean when songs can cross borders but people can’t? How might music work within, against, and beyond a world in which free movement is denied to so many?

A panel conversation will feature all participants and the audience. Evan Ifekoya and Xana will also be performing:

Evan Ifekoya - This Catalogue of Poses, Scenario One: At the Ice Box
A radio play exploring the daily lives of four figures in a photograph, some of whom are more alive than others. Beginning at a spectral house club night in London, the characters dialogue as if inhabiting the past, present and future simultaneously. Drawing on the emotional charge of music, the work evokes image through textures of sound, fragments of conversation, reflections and memories.

Xana - Movement in Minus
a sonic loop exploration into the frequencies of pirate radio and how it is used to instil longevity within black and poc communities.

*****

EVAN IFEKOYA investigates the possibility of an erotic and poetic occupation using film, performative writing and sound, focused on co- authored, intimate forms of knowledge production and the radical potential of spectacle. Their ongoing project ‘A Score, A Groove, A Phantom’ explores archives of blackness, sociality and inheritance as they diffract through queer nightlife and trauma in the present moment. Most recently their work has been propelled by exploring the relationship between a Buddhist practice, speculative fiction, and the echo as affective encounter. Ifekoya’s recent work has been presented at: Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh, Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridgeshire; New Art Exchange, Nottingham (2017); Transmission Gallery, Glasgow; Serpentine Galleries, London; and Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town (2016). Recent performances have taken place at ICA, London and KW institute, Berlin (2017) and Jerwood Space, London and Whitstable Biennial (2016). Ifekoya was an Art Foundation Fellow in Live Art for 2017. 

XANA is a live loop musician, sound designer, composer and poet - often working collaboratively with other artists, researchers, theatre practitioners and filmmakers. In particular Xana is passionate about working with young people, devising creative workshops, encouraging the engagement of others with music, and broadcast technology. They are an organiser of Afrotech Festival; a recipient of Spitalfields Music Open Call funding award; and an artist in residence at Tate Modern and Tate Britain, where they devise workshops for young people. Xana’s interests include archives as places of active memory and future building; sound in architecture; data and its impact on local communities and stories around transhumanism. 

JAMES ESSON is a Lecturer in Human Geography at Loughborough University. His research is broadly located within the field of development geography, and contributes to debates in geography and the wider social sciences by examining development processes in relation to three areas: 1) Unconventional approaches to development 2) International Migration 3) Urban Dynamics. He is Co-Chair of Loughborough University’s BME Staff Network and heads the RGS-IBF RACE Working Group’s Learning and Teaching subcommittee. 

RICHARD BRAMWELL is a Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University. His current research explores the performance of alternative identities through rap; examining the role that hip hop and grime play in a variety of institutional contexts. These include prisons, youth centres, and an arts charity. He is interested in the impact that rap has had on organisations wholly or partially funded by local or national government; the role that the state plays in fostering Britain's rap cultures through these organisations; and how young people perform their identities and represent their communities through rap. 

MAJD ALSAIF is a BSc Media, Culture and Society student at Loughborough University. She is on the committee of Loughborough University’s Ethnic Minorities Network, has been involved with a number of musical events in Loughborough, and is interested in issues around race, gender and social justice. She is working with Evan on a broader project for Radar

*****

The event forms part of (re)composition, Radar’s commissioning programme for 2017/18. Traversing geographies real and imagined, this explores how music makes place and places make music. Featuring contributions from artists, musicians, researchers, and members of Loughborough’s music communities, (re)composition consists of a lively programme of artists’ commissions, performances, compositions, workshops, film screenings and public discussions. Commissioned artists are Sam Belinfante, Evan Ifekoya, Rebecca Lee and Xana. 

*****

Radar is Loughborough University’s contemporary arts organisation, which commissions contemporary art projects that work with, contribute to and draw from research undertaken across Loughborough University’s two campuses.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills

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March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

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Radar has invited artist Mike Cooter to actively engage with New Walk Museum’s collection, taking inspiration from the work of Polish artist and theatre maker Tadeusz Kantor, whose work was concerned with the role and status of the object. The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe, will draw on Kantor’s Anti-Exhibition (1963) and Leicester-born naturalist Henry Walter Bates’ (1825 -92) research into a form of mimicry that would take his name. Working across holdings from fine art, natural history, industrial design, decorative arts and material cultures, the exhibition will look to explore how the objects in the collection both perform and reproduce themselves through their own agency and in symbiotic relationship with organisations that host them.

Kantor has been extensively researched by Dr Dan Watt, Senior Lecturer in Drama, Loughborough University. The exhibition is part of a wider programme, entitled ‘The Object is Alive’, that has invited artists to develop new exhibitions in response to the work of Kantor and their own interest in the agency of the object. The exhibition will be accompanied by a major symposium on the influence of Kantor taking place at Loughborough University on the 28th April 2018.

Associated Events

Exhibition Walk-Through with Mike Cooter
Saturday 5th May, 2pm
New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, 53 New Walk, Leicester, LE1 7EA
Free / Ticketed
Artist Mike Cooter will guide you through his exhibition, introducing his thinking and the works themselves.
To book, please click here

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March 2018

CANCELLED Artist Talk: Kelly Large

March 2018

CANCELLED Artist Talk: Kelly Large

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CANCELLED

Kelly Large’s multi-disciplinary practice engages with acts of public appearance and the agency attached to ‘being visible’; especially how different registers of visibility and public-ness are entangled with the social relations of art practice and its presentation. In both her artistic and curatorial practices she explores these ideas through producing and commissioning live work that uses forms of social choreography to reconsider the relationship between individual and collective agency. In her talk she will discuss the complexities of commissioning live and site specific works in public and private contexts.

Kelly currently works as an independent curator; and as a tutor on the Curating Contemporary Art programme at the Royal College of Art. Between 2013–2016 she was Curator: Public Programme at Zabludowicz Collection, where she produced performances by Helen Benigson, Martin Creed, Alexandre da Cunha, Andy Holden, Raúl de Nieves, Jack Tan and Katrina Palmer; and worked with Rachel Maclean, Heather Phillipson, Jon Rafman and Ryan Trecartin amongst others. Recent projects include Empathy Flows, an evening of spoken word exploring the promotion and consumption of emotion with newly commissioned work by artists and poets; and Fictions Are Realities To Come, a series of new performances intersecting real and virtual worlds.

Her work has been presented at Tate Modern, David Roberts Art Foundation, 52nd Venice Biennale, Eastside Projects, Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art, and MIMA.

Image: Raúl De Nieves, Los oceano son la carne, 2014. Photograph by Ollie Hammick

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February 2018

Artist Talk: Giles Round

February 2018

Artist Talk: Giles Round

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Giles Round is an artist operating across a variety of disciplines including architecture, ceramics, design, print and typography. He engages with materials, processes and collaborators to address the relationship between art, design and functionality. As such the work is populated with citation and misappropriation of an extensive catalogue of collated references. Round’s recent exhibition They bow. Curtain. No applause. at Spike Island in Bristol drew on his professional experience as an exhibition designer to theatricalise the standard systems of display employed by galleries and museums. 

This talk will focus on the making of three recent exhibitions through the roles of artist, curator and designer. 

Recent exhibitions include They bow. Curtain. No applause., Spike Island, Bristol, 2017 (solo); We live in the office, RIBA, London, 2016 (solo); Design Work Leisure, part of ‘Underline’ series, Art on the Underground, London; Ljubljana, 1955, 31st Biennial of Graphic Arts, Galerija Jakopič, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2015 (solo); AGAIN! SORRY! AGAIN! SORRY!, YOUNG TEAM, London, 2015 (solo); Commons Room, Grizedale Arts at Anyang Public Art Project Biennial, Anyang, South Korea, 2014.

Image: Installation view for They bow. Curtain. No applause., 2017, Spike Island, Bristol. Photo by Stuart Whipps.

External Link

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February 2018

Project Launch: The Missing; memory, migration and Partition

February 2018

Project Launch: The Missing; memory, migration and Partition

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Join us at Loughborough University London for an afternoon of discussion to mark the launch of the five-year research project Migrant Memory and the Post-colonial Imagination: British Asian Memory, Identity and Community after Partition, led by Professor Emily Keightley and funded by the Leverhulme Trust. Radar has worked with the project team to organise a panel of artists and academics, who will reflect on their research and creative practice in response to the project’s main themes: Partition, diaspora and memory. The session will be followed by a drinks reception. 


Panel:

- Dawinder Bansal - Creative Producer

- Kazi Ruksana Begum - Arts Development Officer at London Borough of Tower Hamlets

- Prof Raminder Kaur Kahlon - Professor of Anthropology & Cultural Studies at the University of Sussex, and author of Atomic Mumbai: Living with the Radiance of a Thousand Suns (Routledge, 2013)

- Prof Emily Keightley - Professor of Media and Memory Studies at Loughborough Universit and Primary Investigator on the project. Co-author of My library Memory and the Management of Change: Repossessing the Past (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

- Dr Churnjeet Mahn - Chancellor’s Fellow and Senior Lecturer in English Literature  at the University of Strathclyde, and co-editor of Partition and the Practice of Memory (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

- Kevin Ryan - Director of Charnwood Arts

- Dr Pippa Virdee - Senior Lecturer in Modern South Asian History at De Montfort University, Leicester; and author of From the Ashes of 1947: Reimagining Punjab (Cambridge University Press, 2018)

 

Book Tickets

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November 2017

Sounds from a Small Town

November 2017

Sounds from a Small Town

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Merseybeat. Madchester. Detroit techno. The Loughborough Sound? When thinking about music scenes we often think of major cities. But what role does music play in smaller towns and less celebrated places? Join us for a free event where artists, musicians and academics explore these issues through video, discussion and archival material. This is the first public event in (re)composition, Radar's new series of commissions exploring how place makes music and music makes place.

No booking required. For enquiries please email LUArts@lboro.ac.uk

Programme:

- A presentation on the Loughborough Records Presents Presence project from 2016.
Part of Radar's THE Award Nominated  Market Town project, this saw a recording studio constructed in an empty shop unit in Loughborough town centre and provided free of charge to local musicians. A short film about the project can be watched here. Presented by Can Altay, Artist and Associate Professor of Architecture, Istanbul Bilgi University and founder of Loughborough Records Presents Presence.

-"Mansfield's Very Own Steve Malkmus": a film-come-YouTube compilation by Paul Rooney (website), comprising a tour of Kurt Cobain's Aberdeen WA bedroom, Nantwich amp-switches, Trenton NJ Fugazi ticket queues, Goths from (near) Abersoch, paens to Skelmersdale new town, John Peel and Richard D James on the boredom of Redruth, and more.

- Sounds From a Small Town: A Conversation
A panel discussion exploring music in and from small towns and peripheral areas. This will be a broad ranging discussion touching on identity, infrastructure, possibilities and limitations. Panellists: Zoe Armour, PhD Candidate, Media Discourse Group, De Montfort University, Leicester; Rebecca Lee, Artist and Musician (website); Robert Miller, musician and teacher, Loughborough

- Live Music
Stick around after the event for live music until 11pm from Robert Miller and members of the Loughborough Acoustic Club.

- Materials from Loughborough University's archive charting rock music in Loughborough will be on display.

Image: Can Altay's Loughborough Records Presents Presence. Photo by Julian Hughes.

 

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November 2017

Artist Talk - Sam Belinfante

November 2017

Artist Talk - Sam Belinfante

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Commissioned as part of this year's (Re)composition programme, Sam Belinfante will give a talk about this work in-development and other recent work.

This session is aimed at Loughbourough University students but open to all.  

Along with filmmaking and photographic work, Sam's practice incorporates curating, sound and performance. Recent exhibitions include This is a Voice at MAAS Sydney and Wellcome Collection, London (2016-17); The Curves of the Needle at BALTIC 39, Newcastle and The London Open at Whitechapel Gallery, both 2015 and the solo show Many Chambers, Many Mouths, Southard Reid, London (2013). He curated and participated in The Voice and The Lens, IKON Gallery, Birmingham, which toured to Whitechapel Gallery as part of Spitalfields Festival in June 2014. Recent performances include Feedback at Palais De Tokyo, Paris (2017) and On the One Hand and the Other at Camden Arts Centre and Supernormal Festival, UK (2016). 

Recently Sam won the Hayward Touring Curatorial Open. His exhibition Listening opened at BALTIC 39 in September 2014 and toured to the Bluecoat, Liverpool; Site Gallery, Sheffield and the Sheffield Institute of Arts Gallery; and First Site and Art Exchange, Colchester.    

http://www.sambelinfante.com/information/

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October 2017

Creative Community Day Sound Workshop

October 2017

Creative Community Day Sound Workshop

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Join us for a drop-in workshop led by artist Rebecca Lee and discover more about Radar’s upcoming programme Recomposition.

We will experiment using different ways to make sonic compositions that either use or relate to space. Using graphic scores, sound recording, looping, singing and live effects... Over the course of the afternoon, a new piece will emerge.

Rebecca is a musician, composer and artist based at Primary, Nottingham. Her work spans performance, composition and longer-term research-led projects and she regularly explores personal and social relationships with sound and music.

This event is part of Creative Community Day, a creative initiative to inspire people of all ages to get creative through a series of events and workshops. More details can be found here. The day's programme can be viewed here.

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July 2017

Campus Exhibition

July 2017

Campus Exhibition

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For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet

For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet is a collaborative project between Radar and Loughborough University academics Dr Gillian Whiteley and Dr Jane Tormey, RadicalAesthetics-RadicalArt (RaRa).

This engaging programme responds to research into the political pamphlet and the relevance of the pamphlet for contemporary art practice. It has comprised a series of public workshops, a symposium, a Charnwood Museum exhibition and Pamphlet Day, a day-long public event in the town centre. Jane Tormey and Gillian Whiteley are working on a forthcoming edited book, ‘Art, Politics and the Pamphleteer’, to be published in the RaRa series by Bloomsbury.

This exhibition shares elements of this project, including new pamphlets by artists Patrick Goddard, Ferenc Gróf and Rory Pilgrim, commissioned by Radar; a selection of historical pamphlets from the Art of the Pamphlet exhibition; documentation of a series of pamphlet workshops led by artists Freee, Ruth Beale, Ciara Phillips and Little Riot Press and artworks inspired by For & Against workshops led by artists Chiara Dellerba and Sarah Green, and writer Alison Mott.

(Photo from Chiara Dellerba's workshop, by Julian Hughes)

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May 2017

Pamphlet Day - For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet

May 2017

Pamphlet Day - For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet

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For and Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet is a two-day research and public ‘festival’ event responding to research into the political pamphlet and exploring the relevance of the pamphlet for contemporary art practice. 

DAY 2 - Pamphlet Day
Saturday 27 May
Loughborough locations - Charnwood Museum, Loughborough Library and Queens Park

This day-long event takes place across sites in Loughborough. It will involve live performative elements by artists commissioned by Radar and a ‘market’ of stalls where public participation in the making of new pamphlets, zines and protest paraphernalia is actively encouraged. Join us!

FREE, no need to book a place, just turn up!

What's on during Pamphlet Day at a glance:

- The Fertile Ground, exploring choreography, speech and music, plus short walk through Loughborough town

- "Yesterday's Future: And The Reality Of Who We Actually Grew Up To Be" sound installation in Queen's Park bandstand, derived from interviews with Loughborough’s senior citizens

- GBP Camouflage, experimenting with colours and dimensions of British banknotes and military camouflage

- Protest Zine-Making Event, providing drop-in workshops to make your own limited edition publications

- Off Message, printing and editing wearable slogans with stencils and screenprinting

- Miss B's Pop-Up Political Hair Salon, offering professional haircuts whilst you delve into an artist's pamphlet collection (supports the Baca charity)

- Freee in the Park, a social kiosk in Queen's Park offering discussions and badge making

- Stalls: Tales of the Luddites (short stories), Size Acceptance - Towards Inclusivity – A Creative Exploration (exploring body size and weight stigma), What Is To Be Done? (ideas from the Loughborough public), Extra-Ordinary News (create your own stories), Kühle Wampe (blend of traditional market trade with political rally), Leicester Riot Grrls (presenting a Riot Zine), Collaboration: Cooperation As An Act Of Protest (zine-making), and The Urban Pamphleteer (pamphlet inspired discussions).

To see the full programme for all events, please click here.

To see the associated event on Friday 26 May, please click here.

(Image courtesy: Chiara Dellerba)

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May 2017

Public Symposium - For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet

May 2017

Public Symposium - For & Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet

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For and Against: Art, Politics and the Pamphlet is a two-day research and public ‘festival’ event responding to research into the political pamphlet and exploring the relevance of the pamphlet for contemporary art practice.

DAY 1 - Public Symposium
Friday 26 May 
Fearon Hall 
Rectory Road
Loughborough
LE11 1PA

This event includes presentation, performances and rants. Artist-taxi-driver, Mark McGowan provides a keynote presentation and is followed by offerings from Ruth Beale, Tim Brennan, Dean Brannagan, Shirley Cameron, Ben Campkin, Chiara Dellerba, Andrea Gibson, Joanne Lee, radical rethink, Rebecca Ross, Miffy Ryan, Evelyn Silver, Jane Tormey, Mo White, Gillian Whiteley and Andrew Wilson.

Please click here to see the programme.

Tickets: £5, includes lunch. This event can be booked online through the university store.

To see the associated event on Saturday 27 May, please click here.

To see the full programme for all events, please click here.

(Image courtesy: Little Riot Press)

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May 2017

For & Against! The Art of the Pamphlet - Exhibition

May 2017

For & Against! The Art of the Pamphlet - Exhibition

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The political tradition of the pamphlet goes back centuries. The radical, simple format and DIY approach of the pamphlet, has been of long-standing significance for artists, providing alternative platforms for intervention and provocation.

Focusing on the pamphlet as a form of material culture, this exhibition curated by Gillian Whiteley will explore the local, private and public collections of pamphlets, their visual rhetoric, materiality, reproducibility and the ways in which they lend themselves to topicality.

27 May – 24 June: Open daily (Tues – Sat, 10am – 4.30pm)

(Image: Phil Wilson)

May 2017

A Creative Workshop (For Adults) By Alison Mott

May 2017

A Creative Workshop (For Adults) By Alison Mott

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As part of this season's Radar programme For & Against; Art, Politics and the Pamphlet, local writer and historian Alison Mott will lead a FREE creative workshop.

The 19th century Luddite movement has become synonymous with the idea of political protest and the attack on John Heathcoat's lace factory in June 1816 is no exception. But was the 'Loughborough Job' prompted by political unrest or business jealousy? This session will look at the facts surrounding the event and use them as a stimulus for new pieces of writing.

Join us!

(Simply book your free place through Eventbrite)

Book Tickets

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March 2017

Tadeusz Kantor and The Object is Alive with Dr. Emily LaBarge

March 2017

Tadeusz Kantor and The Object is Alive with Dr. Emily LaBarge

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Dr. Emily LaBarge will present an illustrated talk based on her essay for The Object is Alive that examines the work of both Kantor and Matthew Darbyshire.

Emily LaBarge is a writer and researcher based in London. She has a PhD in Critical Writing in Art & Design from the Royal College of Art, where she is visiting lecturer. Amongst other publications, she contributes to esse arts + opinions (Montreal), The Photographers' Gallery and The Cambridge Humanities Review.

Book Tickets

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February 2017

Artist talk and gallery tour with Matthew Darbyshire

February 2017

Artist talk and gallery tour with Matthew Darbyshire

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Matthew Darbyshire will give an enlightening talk about his practice and the influence of Kantor upon his new sculptures. He will also be joined by collection curators who will give more information about the objects he has selected, and then afterwards Matthew will lead a guided tour of the exhibition.

Book Tickets

February 2017

Englishes - A Conversation

February 2017

Englishes - A Conversation

Join us for an afternoon of presentations, discussion and film screenings. Light refreshments will be provided.

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Join us for an afternoon of presentations, discussion and film screenings. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is constructed around artist Nicoline van Harskamp’s preoccupation with investigating the global use of English by non-native speakers around the world. Having already made a series of video works focusing on the subject the artist continued her research at Loughborough University where she was invited by Radar to make a new work in collaboration with its linguists.

A new work, ‘Apologies and Compliments’, was made as part of the commission and will be screened alongside other videos from the series known as Englishes, an on-going a project that seeks to provoke questions about the features and possible declinations of a future global English.

The screenings will be accompanied by a series of discussions led by Nicoline van Harskamp who will host conversations between a group of respondents representing a variety of academic disciplines and the audience including:

Sam Belinfante (Director, Centre of Audio Visual Experimentation, University of Leeds)
Jessica Bradley (Doctoral Researcher, TLANG Project, School of Education, University of Leeds)
Alexandre Christoyannopoulos (Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, Loughborough University)
Heather Connelly (Research Fellow, Faculty of Arts, Design& Media, Birmingham City University)
Arianna Maiorani (Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, Loughborough University)
Jessica Robles (Lecturer in Social Sciences, Loughborough University)

 

External Link

Book Tickets

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January 2017

Exhibition Preview: The Object is Alive - Matthew Darbyshire

January 2017

Exhibition Preview: The Object is Alive - Matthew Darbyshire

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Join us for the Preview of the first in a new series of exhibitions as part of The Object is Alive.

The Object is Alive has invited British artist Matthew Darbyshire to develop a new exhibition that actively engages with Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery and its collection, and is influenced by the work of Polish artist and theatre maker Tadeusz Kantor, who was interested in the role and status of the object.  Matthew has reimagined 12 objects from Nottingham Castle’s collections – including 20th century studio pottery, modernist sculpture and even a grenade from the Regimental Museum. By playing with scale and devising new materials and techniques, including experimenting with different concrete formulas, he has created a series of new works exclusively for the Castle. 

The Object is Alive: Matthew Darbyshire is the first in a series of exhibitions that actively explore the role of object as discussed in Kantor’s writing and artistic outputs. Funded by Arts Council England and the Henry Moore Foundation, this exhibition is part of a collaborative project with Radar at Loughborough University, and will be followed by Mike Cooter at New Walk Museum, Leicester (Winter 2017), and Giles Round at Derby Museums (Spring 2018).

For more information: http://www.nottinghamcastle.org.uk/exhibitions/the-object-is-alive-matthew-darbyshire 

External Link

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November 2016

A Weekend of Weird

November 2016

A Weekend of Weird

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A Weekend of Weird: Where does the real end and the unreal begin?  Can we even distinguish one from the other?

About the Weird: The Weird is an emerging field that encompasses literature, film, music, art and performance. Its world is subtly strange, uncanny, irrational, inexplicable, questioning our everyday environments and perceptions and implying that our world is far more bizarre and disturbing than we would like to believe.

A Weekend of Weird brought together writers, performers, filmmakers, artists, publishers, academics, enthusiasts and celebrants to ask: what is the Weird? Where did it come from? Where is it going?

About the Weekend: The weekend comprised panel discussions, live performances, film screenings and a specialist book fair. Organised by Radar this event was made in collaboration with Nick Freeman and Dan Watt from Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama. Contributions throughout the weekend were made by John Hirschhorn-Smith, Andrew Michael Hurley, Alison Moore, Timothy Jarvis, James Machin, Rosalie Parker and Mark Valentine speaking as part of panel discussions.

These sessions were interspersed with live performances and a series of specially curated film programmes. For this programme Radar commissioned new works by Joey Holder, Ben Judd, Tai Shani and artist collective Reactor. There will also be screenings of work by Sidsel Christensen and Pauline Curnier Jardin.

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A Weekend of Weird Programme
Martin Hall
Main Theatre


Saturday 25 November
10.30 – 7.30pm

Panel Discussion - Welcome to the Weird
Nick Freeman, Dan Watt
10.30am – 11.30pm
Old maps marked unknown lands 'Here Be Dragons'. A Weekend of Weird, organised by Radar, Loughborough University’s contemporary art strand, in collaboration with Nick Freeman and Dan Watt from Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama, explores these strange realms in the company of writers, artists, critics, publishers, performers, and puppets. Nothing will be quite as it seems once you step through 'The Door in the Wall'. Meet 'The Gold Ones'. Be menaced by 'an intensely horrible face of crumpled linen'. Experience the Phantasmagoregasm. Discover what lurks in 'The Inner Room', and enjoy readings from Weird writers past and present.

Panel Discussion – Machenalia
James Machin, Nick Freeman, Dan Watt
11.30am – 12.30pm
The Welsh novelist Arthur Machen (1863-1947) is widely regarded as a founding father of Weird fiction, with stories such as The Great God Pan (1894), 'The White People' (1904), and his account of the 'Angels of Mons', 'The Bowmen' (1915). H.P. Lovecraft hailed his ability to create 'cosmic fear'; subsequent admirers include the film director, Guillermo del Toro, the musician Mark E. Smith, and the comedian Stewart Lee. This session will examine the reasons for Machen's enduring influence and consider his current importance for Weird writers.

Performance - Who Can Seperate Us Now?, Ben Judd 
12.45 – 1.30pm
Netball Badminton Centre, Towers Way, Loughborough University (less than 5 minutes walk from Martin Hall)

For A Weekend of Weird this new commission considers the university as an institution that encourages students to be both free thinkers and part of the student body. This paradox of belonging and not belonging, of being together and separate, will be explored in a performance on campus that tests this position through a series of orchestrated movements and song. Structured movement and choral singing are suggestive of the choreographed, synchronised elements of religious ritual; incorporating handmade costumes that refer to the university’s gowns, the work will examine the blurred boundary between a dramatic performance and a liturgical drama. 
 
Performance – The Gold Ones, Reactor
1.45 – 2.30pm
Look through the walls of the Cosmic Care Home, and listen in on voices from the other side. The place the Gold Ones inhabit resembles what Reactor would describe as a ‘total institution’. They appear to be predominantly cut off from a wider community, and lead an enclosed and bureaucratically controlled existence. Here, now, you can step inside the Cosmic Care Home, where the real action is, surrounded on all sides by the Five Gold Ones.

Panel Discussion - European Weird
Timothy Jarvis, Dan Watt, John Hirschhorn-Smith

2.30 – 3.30pm
European literature and folklore are Weird in many ways, and strikingly distinct from those of the English-speaking world. This session will involve discussions on key figures of the European Weird, including Gustav Meyrink, Hanns Heinz Ewers and Stefan Grabi?ski, and ways in which their influence has been most significant. This session will also feature readings by Alison Moore and Timothy Jarvis.

Performance – Phantasmagoregasm, Tai Shani
4 – 4.45pm
For A Weekend of Weird a chapter from Tai Shani’s ‘Dark Continent’ is told through the Phantasmagoregasm, a supernaturally sensitive creator of daring gothic fictions. Both humanized buildings and a plastic body double becoming decay, becoming violence. A Frankensteinian creature of concrete and flesh in eternal flux of promethean self-actualization. Dark Continent Productions is an ongoing project, currently iterated through character-led installations, films, performances and experimental texts.

Panel Discussion - Sounding His Horn: The Weird World of Sarban
Nick Freeman, Ray Russell, Mark Valentine
5 – 6pm
1950s' Britain was unprepared to imagine worlds in which the Nazis had won the Second World War, women were married to bears, the goddess Artemis appeared to Yorkshire schoolboys, and sinister doll-makers animated wooden bodies with human blood. That these fantasies were those of one of Her Majesty's diplomats makes them all the Weirder. This session considers the author of these bizarre tales, John William Wall (1910-89), alias Sarban, with contributions from his biographer, Mark Valentine, and Ray Russell, whose Tartarus Press has played a crucial role in making his work available once more.

Live Theatre - Casting the Runes, Box Tale Soup
6 – 7pm
Award winning Box Tale Soup invite you to the edge of your seat, on a journey to the darkest corners of the night. Expert on the so-called supernatural, Edward Dunning is a scholar and a sceptic. But when he crosses paths with the mysterious Mr. Karswell, Dunning's life becomes a waking nightmare. Join us for a chilling new adaptation of M.R. James' classic supernatural thriller, Casting the Runes.
Our advice? Don't come alone...

Sunday 26 November
10.30 – 4.30pm

Panel Discussion – Aickmania
Nick Freeman, Ray Russell, Dan Watt

10.30am – 12.30pm
The writer and anthologist Robert Aickman (1914-81) is increasingly recognised as one of the most original proponents of the Weird Tale. His fiction entwined the fantastic with the mundane in bold and startling ways, transforming the familiar into the bizarre and uncanny. In what Aickman called 'strange tales', everyday objects and events - clocks, telephones, church bells, trains - assume menacing new guises. This session features discussions of Aickman's work and influence, and includes screenings of the Tartarus Press documentary, Robert Aickman: Author of Strange Tales and HTV's television adaptation of his story, 'The Inner Room', unseen since 1987.

Panel Discussion – Where are we? Being Weird Now
Catherine Spooner, Timothy Jarvis, Alison Moore, Andrew Michael Hurley
2.30 – 4pm
Writers and critics consider the current state of the Weird. What is it? Where is it going? And what sorts of relationship do today's Weird writers have with their predecessors? Expect lively discussion and debate! This session will also feature readings by Andrew Michael Hurley from his Costa Prize-winning novel, The Loney.

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Throughout the whole weekend...

Weird World - Joey Holder
Theatre Foyer, Martin Hall

Joey Holder has taken on board influences of H P Lovecraft to modify the institutional environment of the foyer and cafe by installing ‘cyclopean’ imagery of strange aquatic creatures and beasties. The work is inspired by the symbolism from Lovecraft’s ‘The Call of Cthulhu’ in which ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’ entangle and disintegrate. Rather than adhering to binary definitions, everything here becomes mutated mesh, not limited to human systems of definition and categorisation.

Weird Films

Day is Done - Reactor
Leonard Dixon Studio, Martin Hall - 10.30am – 5pm

Artist collective Reactor present Day is Done, a selection of films offering interpretations and regurgitations of culture; from dancing bird-headed humanoids, to fantasy roleplay, Goths, hillbillies, mimes and demons. Each of the works use dance and performance as a backbone, reconfiguring and replacing body parts and cultural identities as required.

An0nymooose
[SFM] Berdst friend, 2016 (01:40)
[SFM] Trunk Trumpets, 2015 (00:46)
[SFM] We like to party, 2014 (00:43)
[SFM] Off Limits, 2014 (01:20)
An0nymooose’s YouTube videos take characters and objects from the video game world using the Source Filmmaker [SFM], and bend them into various forms, replacing heads with those of a bird, making an elephant-humanoid play their own trunk, and mashup usually straightforward video game forms. Operating outside the artworld, these works appeal to the joy of seeing normality rearranged, with An0nymooose’s YouTube channel clocking up over 36 million views.

Carmen Argote
Everything is in its place, but Everything is everywhere, 2016 (28:12)
The work is a portrait of Alejandra Argote, the artist’s sister. Surrounded by visual and physical clutter, props, stacked boxes and various creations, we are allowed a glimpse of both the siblings’ relationship and that of Alejandra’s fantastical otherworld. The re-arrangement of objects in the confined room presses home that her fantasy is a complex lexicon, and hints at the possibilities presented by various alternate identities. The video is part of a body of work entitled Alex’s Room, an ongoing collaboration between the two women.  

Mike Kelley
Day is Done, 2005-6 (169 min)
Kelley’s carnivalesque opus is a genre-smashing epic in which vampires, dancing Goths, hillbillies, mimes and demons come together in a kind of subversive musical theater/variety revue. This riotous, feature-length theatrical spectacle unfolds as an episodic series that forms a loose, fractured narrative. The video comprises parts 2-32 of Kelley’s multi-faceted project Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstructions, in which trauma, abuse and repressed memory are refracted through personal and mass-cultural experience. The source materials are high school yearbook photographs of ‘extracurricular activities’; or what Kelley terms ‘socially accepted rituals of deviance'; Kelley then stages video narratives around these found images. Here these re-stagings take the form of 'folk entertainments' that Kelley memorably subverts.

Simon Raven
The Crippled Gherkin, 2015 (05:53)
Golden Rage, clips, 2015 (01:52)
Noise Tent, 2013 (03:53)
These three video works span varied collaborations, impromptu and evolving performances, and workshop outcomes. We see crude provocations garnering responses from festival goers using typical camping gear, or using literal puns such as ‘Charity Gherkins’, performed in front of the Damien Hirst sculpture ‘Charity’ and iconic London building ‘The Gherkin’, that bring cultural cliches together into visual tableaux that address topics such as cuts to disability benefit.


And finally...

Special screenings of Sidsel Christensen’s A Conversation at the Edge of the Object (2014) and Pauline Curnier Jardin’s Le Salon d’Alone (2010)

 

External Link

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November 2016

'ough'ough Commission Live

November 2016

'ough'ough Commission Live

On 28 March, the two outcomes of the Market Town commission 'ough'ough will be launched simultaneously: a trio of town centre billboards and a specially designed website.

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For the Market Town project design collective Europa collaborated with artist and illustrator Peter Nencini on a commission entitled 'ough'ough. This commission explored the complex issues that surround the creation of graphic identities for places, and thinking about the differences between brand and place identity.

Robert Sollis of Europa and Peter made a number of visits to the town and met with longstanding businesses and institutions alongside more recent start-ups and research centres to gain a sense of the objects found and knowledge that is produced in Loughborough.

The body of visual research takes several distinct forms: a trio of large-scale printed illustrations displayed on a number of billboards in the town centre (7 - 20 November), a set of limited edition postcards and oughough.co.uk, a specially designed website that contextualizes the billboard works and discusses issues surrounding identity of place and their relationship with place-based branding.

Please contact luarts@lboro.ac.uk for a set of 'ough'ough postcards.

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October 2016

Weird Drawing Workshop

October 2016

Weird Drawing Workshop

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Join us for a drop-in drawing workshop led by artist Sarah Taylor Silverwood who uses a combination of hand-drawn illustration, found imagery and text in her work. This workshop is part of the Loogabarooga Festival, an annual event for families who love books and illustrated literature.

This workshop is inspired by Radar’s ‘Weekend of Weird’. More information.

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October 2016

Firing the Generator - Open Weekend

October 2016

Firing the Generator - Open Weekend

Firing the Generator brought Loughborough's new cultural, creative and entrepreneurial hub, The Generator, to life.

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Over the weekend of the 1st and 2nd October Stealth.unlimited delivered the final project as part of Market Town.  They designed a spatial intervention within the former art school building.  Each day the configuration of the spatial elements changed to test out new possibilities.  The space was then activated through a variety of performances, workshops, events that animated the space and offered a vision for its future use.

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September 2016

Seminar - The Civic University

September 2016

Seminar - The Civic University

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Overview:

Historically a civic university was the term given to a university devised to tend to a particular civic need - an institution created for the development of teaching and learning of a (predominately industrial) discourse. However a more contemporary understanding of this term is to think about the increasing ‘need’ for universities’ to actively engage with their locality; to be successful and resilient.

What is the role of the university in supporting the town it inhabits?  Has it got a duty to engage with the wider society in which it inhabits?  Are there innovative ways in which a university can improve the economy of the town?

These are all questions to be discussed at our forthcoming seminar involving artists and academics whose work has involved them in examining the role of the higher education and its link to the local economy. 

Join us for the last in our current series of public seminars; this informal evening event is designed to explore the concept of a ‘civic university’ through a series of presentations by leading practitioners.

Speakers:

Andrew Merritt and Paul Smyth, Design Collective - Something & Son

As part of their Market Town commission design collective Something & Son have explored the relationship between the civic and the university in their project Market Lectures, where Loughborough’s town market and University traded places.
Their commission has resulted in a specially designed structure that functions both as a market stall and lecture theatre. The structure became the centre piece for a series of public events - a University Market where the town’s market traded on campus for one day, and a series of Market Lectures where students and academics traded places and hosted a series of public academic sessions in the town’s market place. For more information about Something & Son: http://somethingandson.com/
 
Dr Clare Melhuish, Senior Research Associate & Co-Director, UCL Urban Laboratory

Since her appointment in 2013 Clare has initiated research University-led Regeneration, a set of comparative case studies, featuring a range of cross-disciplinary urban research methods, designed to inform the development of UCL's own spatial development project in east London and discussions about the university's own role within inclusive urban development in London. This research has made a significant contribution to the university's cross-disciplinary scholarship on urban regeneration, and public and academic debates more widely.

This initial set of five case studies from the research project, which analyse the processes and impacts of urban regeneration initiatives led by universities in the UK and US, was originally published in September 2015, and forms the basis for an ongoing process of dissemination and research development based in the UCL Urban Laboratory. They are open access - freely available to download and share online - so that they can inform a wider discussion about the role of universities in urban change – available here: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/urbanlab/news/university-regeneration-case-studies

Professor Darren Smith

As a Social Population Geographer, Darren is fascinated by the ways in which places and neighbourhoods are transformed by contemporary processes of migration and population change, and how new social relations and conflicts are created.   Examining these connections, his research is focussed on social and population change in a range of urban, rural, and coastal places to advance theoretical, conceptual and empirical understandings of the formation of more exclusive, segregated, marginalised, and transient societies. 

Since the late 1990s, Darren’s research has investigated the links between higher education, student populations, and urban change, coining the term ‘studentification’, to conceptualise these processes of change within university towns and cities.  For more information: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/geography/staff/academic/smith-d.html

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-civic-university-tickets-25739017093

External Link

Book Tickets

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June 2016

Loughborough Records Presents Presence (LIVE)

June 2016

Loughborough Records Presents Presence (LIVE)

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Loughborough’s musicians have joined Loughborough Records Presents Presence (LRPP) to write and record their music and now they are going to perform it at a live event.

Earlier this year Can Altay created an installation that took the form of a recording studio known as LRPP and local bands were invited to perform and record their songs. Over three weeks, 70 songs were recorded by 30 bands. The recordings of which are available online. The recording studio was a commission created as part of the Radar programme Market Town, influenced by the way in which popular music, produced in specific locations, has created a specific ‘sound’, reaching out to audiences beyond the location in which it originated (e.g. Detroit, Bristol, Manchester and many others). Can Altay is interested in the possibilities music has in creating a wider impact and engendering a positive perception of the place of origin.

This project culminates in a series of live performances taking place in a bespoke staged area in Queen’s Park and the production of a special, limited edition, vinyl record featuring a number of the recorded tracks.

This event is organised as part of Radar’s current project, Market Town, a long-term project comprising commissions and critical debate designed to engage with the regeneration of Loughborough’s high street. The Market Town public events programme is intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

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April 2016

Loughborough Market Lectures

April 2016

Loughborough Market Lectures

On Thursday 28 and Friday 29 April Loughborough University lecturers will give a series of lectures in Loughborough's Market Square as part of Something & Son's Market Town commission.

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A series of University lectures will be taking place in Loughborough’s town centre on Thursday 28 and Friday 29 April. This event is part of Something & Son’s Market Town commission Market Lectures, where the University and the market are trading places. The Market Lectures will be preceded by a University Market on Wednesday 27 April, when market traders will be coming to the University campus for a special market day. 

Something & Son have been playfully exploring the relationship between the two things that Loughborough is most famous for: the day-to-day activity of its markets and its University. These two elements from the town are usually quite separate and the design collective has created a unique installation which brings them together. A symbolic structure will be constructed which functions as both a market stall and a small lecture theatre and will form the centrepiece of both market and lectures. This structure will be produced by a local welder and can be used as a place for the trade of goods as well as knowledge. 

MARKET LECTURES PROGRAMME - THURSDAY 28 APRIL

9am – 10am 
Towards Ash-Wednesday by Dr. Oliver Tearle
Lecturer in English

After T. S. Eliot's conversion to Christianity in 1927, his poetry found a new direction, and this is what Dr. Oliver Tearle will consider in his seminar. Dr. Tearle will be focusing particularly on T. S. Eliot's 1927 poem 'Journey of the Magi', which he wrote shortly after his conversion, and his 1930 poem 'Ash-Wednesday'. (This is a student seminar session) 

11am – 12pm
Making Mischief in Public by Antoinette Burchill 
Phd School of the Arts 

Antoinette has performed at street arts festivals across the UK: from Derby Festé, to Bath’s Bedlam Fair, to Kendal Mintfest, to a Banquet Tour of Cumbria. In her lecture Antoinette will talk about how she developed The Wizard of Oz as a walkabout street performance, and the tactics she uses to create a theatre on the street where none really exists. She states there is a delight in performing to a street audience who is expectant – waiting around for you to do something interesting, but there is more mischief to be made by guerrilla street performances. By seeking out, and then surprising an unsuspecting audience. 

To book tickets for this event click here....

1pm – 2pm
Art, Activism and Alternative Institutions by Dr. Vlad Morariu & Jaakko Karhunen 
AHRC Cultural Engagement Fellowand Co-Researcher & Phd Research Student

1968 was the year in which there was a worldwide escalation of social conflicts, predominantly characterized by popular rebellions against military and bureaucratic elites. When thinking of this year, many will remember the French workers and students organizing the general strikes and university and factory occupations, or the invasion of Prague by Warsaw Pact troops. But what is the significance of 1968 for Britain? Dr. Vlad Morariu and Jaakko Karhunen will explore a chain of events in Britain ranging from the founding of the London Anti-University and its connections to the (anti)psychiatric institution of Kingsley Hall, to the art school occupations that happened in a number of art schools across the UK. The lecture explores the particular intersection between philosophy, psychiatry and art practices and theory and their influence in shaping the anti-establishment thrust of 1968 in Britain, and questions their role in shaping the contemporary intellectual, political and cultural public sphere.

To book tickets for this event click here....

3pm - 4pm
The home: an energy machine for comfortable living? by Kate Simpson & Vicki Tink 
Phd Civil and Building Engineering

“A house is a machine for living in”. (Le Corbusier, 1923)
The home is ideally a comfortable, cosy place in which people feel safe and able to create precious memories with family or loved ones, right? Physical comfort is likely provided by a mechanical heat source and stored within the outer shell. What happens when we adjust the thermodynamics of the shell or adjust the efficiency of the mechanical heat source? How does this even take place? Is it invasive? How do people respond to changes in surface temperature and air velocity? An exploration of perceptions of comfort combined with empirical measurements to create a story of life within the machine called home.

To book tickets for this event click here....


MARKET LECTURES PROGRAMME - FRIDAY 29 APRIL

9 – 10am
The Role of Rapid Diagnostics In Humanity's 'War Against Bugs' by Dr. Sourav Ghosh

Lecturer in Healthcare Engineering

Rapid diagnosis of infections for early onset of appropriate treatment is essential to save lives and limit antimicrobial resistance. The state-of-the-art diagnostics is unable to address this need. This talk presents the importance of rapid diagnostics, the fundamental challenges in realising them in practice, and the innovations and cross-disciplinary skills required to address these challenges. It will also discuss the role of Loughborough University in bringing together global expertise from academia, industry and clinic to fight what is arguably the greatest threat to humanity. (This is a student seminar session)

11am – 12pm
What makes a successful career? by Professor John Arnold 
Professor of Organisational Behaviour in the School of Business and Economics

Everywhere you look these days there’s an emphasis on success, with a lot of envy of those who appear to have more of it than we do. Luckily, success is a very flexible concept. Applying it to our working lives, in this session Prof. Arnold will explore with the audience different ways of thinking about success in a career. He will also use academic research to consider how (and whether) we can increase our chances of achieving the kind of career success we want. This will be applicable to any working life, not just high status jobs with prospects.   

To book tickets for this event click here....

1-2pm
No Laughing Matter? The History and Science of Laughter by Dr. Tim Miles
Lecturer in Drama

Why do we laugh? It is, when you think about it, an extraordinary thing to do. Our stomach muscles tense, we make strange sounds, start crying, and maybe even lose control of our bowels.  And all because someone has fallen over in the office.  Laughing is usually pleasurable but being tickled can be almost torture. We laugh when we are nervous or afraid, or want to feel part of a group, or to have people like us. Laughter is very odd, and very human. The talk will consider historical explanations of laughter, from seeing it as a sign of the presence of the devil to a form of mental illness, touching on the ideas of Kant, Nietzsche, Freud and others, to more recent discoveries in neuroscience and evolutionary biology. What happens when rats are tickled? Will computers ever be funny? How may laughter fit into out earliest developments of language?  Discover all this, and more!

To book tickets for this event click here....

4-5pm
Dare we care? How we might make child mortality a thing of the past by Dr. David Roberts
Senior Lecturer of Peace and Conflict Studies

Every year, nearly 6 million infants die before they reach the age of 5 – the most vulnerable of our species. Doctors say proximate cause of death is mostly avoidable, so why do these epic fatalities occur? Dr. Roberts will discuss this philosophically, emotionally, politically, economically and in terms of global power structures that determine who lives and who dies. This might help us to see how easy child mortality is to fix, not by extraordinary people doing extraordinary things, but by ordinary people creating extraordinary outcomes.

To book tickets for this event click here....

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April 2016

University Market

April 2016

University Market

On Wednesday 27 April Loughborough Markets will host a special University Market on campus as part of Something & Son's commission for Market Town.

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OFFICIAL OPENING: WED. 27 APRIL, 9.30AM

Loughborough Markets will host a special University Market on campus on Wednesday 27 April, inviting a group of independent traders to sell at the University. This event is part of Something & Son’s Market Town commission Market Lectures, where the University and the market are trading places. The University Market will be followed by two days of Market Lectures in Loughborough’s Market Square. 

On Wednesday 27 April at 9.30 the University Market will be officially opened by Loughborough University's Vice Chancellor Robert Allison and Loughborough's Mayor John Capleton. Please join us for some refreshments at 9.30am and have a browse through the market, including traders with fruit, vegetables, eggs, cheese, organic meats, luxury home baking, handmade jewellery, reclaimed wooden items, leather goods and cosmetics. 

Something & Son have been playfully exploring the relationship between the two things that Loughborough is most famous for: the day-to-day activity of its markets and its University. These two elements from the town are usually quite separate and the design collective has created a unique installation which brings them together. A symbolic structure will be constructed which functions as both a market stall and a small lecture theatre and will form the centrepiece of both market and lectures. This structure will be produced by a local welder and can be used as a place for the trade of goods as well as knowledge. 

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March 2016

Creative Markets

March 2016

Creative Markets

This workshop is for creative people interested in exploring the opportunities of Loughborough as a market place, whether that’s for profit or social capital.

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This workshop is for creative people interested in exploring the opportunities of Loughborough as a market place for their work, whether that’s for profit or social capital. It will include presentations about specialist and pop-up creative markets that are inspiring and locally relevant, discuss the benefits of using a market stall as a testing ground/marketing opportunity, and how markets can create a network of mutual support and build critical mass.

You can expect to hear current ideas and plans for a new Creative Market, which will take place in the town centre later in 2016, as a way of gathering and testing interest in this as a model for Loughborough. You will have the opportunity to discuss and find out more about how to take part. We will also be hearing from:

Bird in Borrowed Feathers – a team of creatives who organise exciting contemporary craft fairs in Nottingham city centre. Their events bring together a huge range of designers, makers, creatives and small businesses.

Ceramics in Charnwood – Local artists David and Louise Salsbury have developed this annual contemporary ceramics market over the last five years. Hear about how the market has grown and how it benefits its stallholders.

Loughborough to Margate – Observations on the creative ecology and ways creative professionals are collaborating, co-working and networking in the town of Margate.

This event has been curated for Market Town by The Refectory Table. Based in Loughborough, created and run by Janet Currie, The Refectory Table offers inspirational creative business courses, workshops and events for makers, artists and independent businesses.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Book Tickets

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February 2016

Digital Citizen

February 2016

Digital Citizen

In the last five years, every part of the UK economy and our lives has been digitised. The seminar will consider both the huge changes that have taken place and how as digital citizens we can utilise digital technology in order to actively engage with the world around us.

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In the last five years, the UK’s digital economy has changed beyond recognition. Every part of the UK economy and our lives has been digitised – from how we shop and entertain ourselves to the way we travel to work and manage our health. For some the digital revolution has been seen as contributing to the decline of our high streets, but the focus of this seminar will be about the positive contribution the digital can make to communities, how it can enhance the town centre customer experience and support the prosperity of our town centres.

The seminar will consider both the huge changes that have taken place and how as an individual, or digital citizen, we can utilise digital technology in order to actively engage with the world around us. Featuring a panel of leading practitioners, united by their research and practice, this seminar will offer an opportunity to discuss the transformational impact of digital technologies on community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. We will be hearing from a cross section of individuals working in this field:

Ben Eaton
Ben Eaton is the lead digital artist for Invisible Flock; three interactive artists based in Leeds. They make highly participatory live and digital work on a large scale. Drawing from real life, their practice invites people to reimagine the world they live in and how they participate in it, using technology to incite meaningful encounters. Invisible Flock have made seafront installations powered by apps interacting with nautical buoys floating out at sea, sound walks across Morecambe Bay accompanied by the Queen’s last Sand Pilot, created revolutionary communities via SMS, new pieces that span continents as well as work for galleries such as the V&A, MIMA and John Hansard and festivals such as The Tbilisi International Festival, Brighton Festival, L’Entorse Lille and Unbox India.

Guy Douglas
Guy Douglas recently served as the principal consultant to the government’s Future High Streets Forum’s Digital High Street Advisory Board, and was the project manager for the Digital HighStreet 2020 policy report to Department for Communities and Local Government and Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, published in March 2015. He currently runs Connected Places UK, an independent consultancy with a focus on the digital high street agenda, with emerging thinking on “Smart City 2.0” and incorporating the online-mobile-digital experience into place management.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Book Tickets

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February 2016

Market Day

February 2016

Market Day

Join us on Saturday 6 February, when we’ll be celebrating the culmination of three projects being undertaken as part of Market Town.

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Join us on Saturday 6 February to celebrate the culmination of three projects undertaken as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and debate that seeks to re-imagine the future of Loughborough town centre. The event will take place in Market Town Corner, a shop space Radar has been programming for the past 6 months. Market Day offers a final opportunity to view the shop space, see the contributions by local community that have been collected there and documentation on the three projects presented on that day. 

Tea, coffee, juice and pastries will be served from 11.00am and Radar's Nick Slater and Kate Self will provide an introduction to the projects at 11.30am and give a short tour around Can Altay’s installation and Kathrin Böhm’s Brand News.

Can Altay - Loughborough Records Presents Presence 
Market Town Corner, Carillon Court Shopping Centre

Throughout January recording sessions by the town’s musicians have been taking place within the framework of Can Altay’s installation. Loughborough Records Presents Presence is an ongoing project that seeks to unite the musicians and engender a sense of civic pride through the recording and presentation of the town’s bands and musicians. The first element of the project is the creation of a pop up recording studio, which functions as a sculptural environment that is activated by local music and musicians. The music will then be presented on a website, a record label will be created, and vinyl, containing the music of the town will be pressed.  The project will culminate in a day of live performances by the participating musicians at a local venue. Market Day will be an opportunity to view the installation and hear the sounds of Loughborough that have been recorded over the month.  

Kathrin Böhm & An Endless Supply - Brand News
Ashby Square News

Kathrin Böhm and designers An Endless Supply have worked with a wide variety of groups to look at the branding of everyday products found in a local independent news agents called Ashby Square News. Through a series of hands-on workshops the artists and a large number of participants have collaboratively created re-brands for all the products in the shop. The project culminates on Market Day with a celebratory Shop Launch. For one day only the entire contents of Ashby Square News will be filled with the rebranded products. 

Europa & Peter Nencini - 'ough'ough
Market Town Corner

Graphic design practice Europa have worked with illustrator Peter Nencini to develop a new graphic identity for Loughborough. The project questions existing identities, asking questions such as ‘what is this place’, ‘what was this place?’ and ‘what could this place become?’  Their work in Loughborough has engaged the artists in thinking about identity and place, and a graphic designer’s role in relation to this. Much of their time research they have created designs which will be displayed on three billboards in Loughborough town centre later this year. These billboards will be complemented by a website which presents more detailed accounts of the research involved in the project and its artistic outcomes. On Market Day, archive material relating to the project will be on display in Market Town Corner. There is also the opportunity to take part in a special drop-in workshop led by the artists from 1.30-3.30pm.

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February 2016

Brand News Shop Launch

February 2016

Brand News Shop Launch

Join Kathrin Böhm and An Endless Supply for the grand finale of their fascinating commission, Brand News, as they rebrand the entire stock of local independents newsagent Ashby Square News.

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What if there were no logos and no brands? What would we call products and how would we recognise them? Brand News invites people in Loughborough to take a look at everyday products and have a go at un-branding them.

Throughout December and January artist Kathrin Böhm and designers An Endless Supply will be leading a series of hands-on workshops, working with Loughborough groups and individuals, to take everyday products off the shelf and reimagine how they might look: turn coke into brown juice, rewrap chocolate bars and design front pages of newspaper and magazines. As the new looks and individualised brands are created they will go on display in the Market Town Corner shop unit in Carillon Court.

This project will culminate in a day-long event which will see the packaging designs that came out of the workshops used to rebrand the entire stock of local independent newsagent Ashby Square News. This day will function as an experiment looking at how branding affects consumer behaviour and how the reimagining of familiar branded products will affect their popularity. No advance booking is needed - just drop by to get in on the fun!

To learn more about the commission being delivered by Kathrin and An Endless Supply visit their project page here.

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January 2016

LRPP Songwriting workshop

January 2016

LRPP Songwriting workshop

Join us for the LRPP Songwriting workshop this Sunday 31 January from 11am to 2pm with Robin Chapman.

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Join us for the LRPP Songwriting workshop this Sunday 31 January from 11am to 2pm with Robin Chapman. The workshop takes place at the LRPP recording studio in Market Town Corner in the Carillon Court Shopping Centre, Loughborough. 

* The songs written in the workshop will be recorded.
* We will work as a group.
* No prior experience needed.
* You can bring your instrument or use available equipment.

When you want to attend this workshop, please come to the Market Town Corner in Carillon Court Shopping Centre, Loughborough. 

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January 2016

Loughborough Jewels for Families

January 2016

Loughborough Jewels for Families

Create a unique brooch that shares and preseves your memories of Loughborough with jeweller and jewellery historian Roberta Bernabei. This workshop is for children aged 5+ and their families.

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As part of Roberta Bernabei's project Loughborough Jewels, join us for a special family workshop for children aged 5+ and their parents/guardians. In this workshop you will create your own jewellery inspired by Loughborough.

PLEASE NOTE THAT PARENTS/GUARDIANS DO NOT NEED TO BOOK A TICKET TO ATTEND.

Book Tickets

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January 2016

Loughborough Jewels Exhibition

January 2016

Loughborough Jewels Exhibition

Come along to the Market Town Corner for the exhibition of Loughborough Jewels - a project by jeweller and jewellery historian Roberta Bernabei.

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Come along to the Market Town Corner for the conclusion of Loughborough Jewels - a project by jeweller and jewellery historian Roberta Bernabei. This participatory project seeks to share and preserve memories of the Market Town of Loughborough, and has worked with local residents to create a set of unique brooches.

Participants were asked to bring along an image, photograph or object relating to their memories of Loughborough, before describing to Roberta the item's significance to themselves and the town. Roberta then combined imagery and words resulting from these workshops with the form of a window frame found in the town centre to create the brooches. This exhibition gives everyone a chance to see what has been created during the project, and all brooches will all be returned to their new owners after its conclusion.

The exhibition will be available for viewing at the following times - please note the differing times for Saturday 30 January:

Thursday 28 January
11am - 4pm

Friday 29 January
11am - 4pm

Saturday 30 January
10am - 1pm

Roberta will also be running a special workshop for children aged 5+ and their families. Click here to find out more. Please be aware that parents/guardians DO NOT need to book a ticket in order to attend this family workshop.

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January 2016

Loughborough Jewels Workshops

January 2016

Loughborough Jewels Workshops

Create a unique brooch that shares and preseves your memories of Loughborough with jeweller and jewellery historian Roberta Bernabei, and be part of a special Loughborough Jewels exhibition in the Market Town Corner.

Click to read more

Book your place on Thursday 21 January

Book your place on Friday 22 January

Book your place on Saturday 23 January

Join jeweller and jewellery historian Roberta Bernabei in the creation of a new series of brooches as part of her Loughborough Jewels project. This participatory project seeks to share and preserve memories of the Market Town of Loughborough.

You will be asked to bring along an image, photograph or object that relates to your memories of Loughborough, and Roberta will take a record of your object and ask you to describe it and its significance to you and the town. This will form the basis for a brooch design, that Roberta will make and that you will be able to collect at the end of the project. To participate please book a session using the links above.

Each brooch will take its form from a window frame found in the town and will be completed with imagery and words given to Roberta by each of the participants. As the brooches are finished they will join part of a special exhibition installation. At the end of the exhibition all participants will be able to collect and keep their brooch.

The exhibition will be available for viewing at the following times:

Thursday 28 January
11am - 4pm

Friday 29 January
11am - 4pm

Saturday 30 January
10am - 1pm

Roberta will also be running a special workshop for children aged 5+ and their families. Click here to find out more. Please be aware that parents/guardians DO NOT need to book a ticket in order to attend this family workshop.

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January 2016

Free Recording Studio Sessions

January 2016

Free Recording Studio Sessions

Are you a musician or in a band and based in Loughborough? Then we want to hear from you! Throughout January, our pop-up recording studio is giving you the chance to record and distribute your music for FREE right in the town centre.

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Are you a musician or in a band based in Loughborough? Then we want to hear from you!

We are looking for the sounds of Loughborough, and our new pop-up recording studio in the town centre is just the place to find them. This space gives you the chance to record your music with the assistance of a professional sound engineer and all instruments provided, then have it distributed through a dedicated website - and all for FREE.

All of our recording advance booking studio sessions are now full, but we are running two drop-in studio sessions open to all!

Wed 27 Jan, 18:30 – 21:00: FULL BAND JAM SESSION

Sun 31 Jan, 11:00 – 14:00: SONGWRITING WORKSHOP

This event is part of Can Altay's commission for Market Town, Loughborough Records Presents Presence. Influenced by many other examples of how popular music produced in specific locations has created a specific ‘sound’ that has reached out to audiences much further than the location in which it originated (e.g. Detroit, Bristol, Manchester and many others), Can Altay is interested in the possibilities music has in creating a wider impact and engendering a positive perception of the place of origin.

Book Tickets

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December 2015

Brand News Drop in Workshops

December 2015

Brand News Drop in Workshops

Brand News invites people in Loughborough to take a look at everyday products and have a go at un-branding them in these FREE creative drop in workshops.

Click to read more

What if there were no logos and no brands? What would we call products and how would we recognise them? Brand News invites people in Loughborough to take a look at everyday products and have a go at un-branding them.

Throughout December and January artist Kathrin Böhm and designers An Endless Supply will lead a series of hands-on workshops, working with Loughborough groups and individuals, to take everyday products off the shelf and reimagine how they might look: turn coke into brown juice, rewrap chocolate bars and design front pages of newspaper and magazines.

The workshops will collectively re-brand the full product range from a local corner shop, Ashby Square News. As the new looks and individualised brands are created they will go on display in the Market Town Corner shop unit in Carillon Court. On Saturday 6th February the full range of reworked goods will move back into the shop, taking over all shelves and display areas - click here to find out more.

The workshops are free to attend and no booking is required - just drop in! They will be taking place from 11am - 4pm on the following dates:

Thurs 7 January

Fri 8 January

Sat 9 January

Thurs 14 January

Fri 15 January

Sat 16 January

We are also running pre-booked workshops for local groups including community groups and schools. The dates and times have some flexibility and the workshop can be tailored to the group taking part. For more information please email Kate Self or call her on 01509 222899.

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November 2015

The Rise of the Local

November 2015

The Rise of the Local

Join us for a seminar on the rise of new sustainable economies and collaborative production that no longer respond to the dictates of the market and the managerial hierarchy.

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Our economy is changing. We are looking for alternatives to the accepted capitalist norm. We are exploring new sustainable economic systems that have new values and behaviours. Some have argued that we are seeing the spontaneous rise of collaborative production: goods, services and organisations are appearing that no longer respond to the dictates of the market and the managerial hierarchy. The biggest information product in the world – Wikipedia – is made by volunteers for free, abolishing the encyclopedia business and depriving the advertising industry of an estimated $3bn a year in revenue. Parallel currencies, time banks, cooperatives and self-managed spaces have proliferated, barely noticed by the economics profession, and often as a direct result of the shattering of the old structures in the post-2008 crisis.  For this seminar we have invited individuals involved or interested in new sustainable economies and less recognised modes of economic co-ordination to speak about their work. The speaker at this event will be:

Naomi Diamond

Naomi works for Locality, the national network of ambitious and enterprising community-led organisations, working together to help neighbourhoods thrive. Based in Leicester, she has worked with numerous member organisations and partners in the Midlands supporting the development of viable and sustainable community enterprises, for example wind-farms, housing developments, community farms and other asset developments. For the last three years she managed the national Community Organisers Training Programme and is a strong believer in the power of people to make change happen locally. Before coming to Locality (formerly the Development Trusts Association), Naomi was involved in the local food sector and was a founder member of Leicestershire Food Links, a local food community enterprise running farmers markets and local food projects. She is a Board member of Soft Touch Arts, a  youth arts charity which has recently taken over a vacant City centre building in Leicester and created a £1m Youth Arts and Heritage Centre.

http://locality.org.uk/

David Boyle

David Boyle is the author of Broke: How to Survive the Middle Class Crisis (Foutrh Estate) published 16 Jan 2014.  He was recently the government’s independent reviewer on Barriers to Public Service Choice (the Boyle Review, 2012-13), for the Cabinet Office and Treasury. He was part of the team at the New Economics Foundation which ran the successful ‘Clone Town Britain’ campaign (2004-10), which changed the language and shifted the debate about high streets. He has been at the heart of the effort to develop co-production and introduce time banks to Britain as a critical element of public service reform.  He was co-author of three key reports for NESTA in 2009/10, The Challenge of Co-production, Public Services Inside Out and Right Here, Right Now which set out co-production as a practical way forward for UK services. David is the author of a number of books about history, social change and the future of money.  His book Authenticity: Brands, Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life (Flamingo, 2003) helped put the search for authenticity on the agenda as a social phenomenon.  The Tyranny of Numbers (Flamingo, 2001) and The Sum of Our Discontent (Texere, 2001) predicted the backlash against the government’s target culture.  Funny Money: In search of alternative cash (Flamingo, 1999) launched the time banks movement in the UK.  He was a member of the federal policy committee of the Liberal Democrats (1998-2012).

http://www.david-boyle.co.uk/

Kathrin Böhm

Kathrin Böhm is an artist and founding member of the London-based art and architecture collective public works, and the pan-European artist initiative myvillages.org.  Projects are produced collaboratively and within the public realm. Kathrin is interested in the possible production of public space through art led formats of production and trade, where polarised producer and consumer roles can be interrupted and re-envisaged. She considers economy as a public realm where values are being produced and negotiated, and is particularly interested in collective processes to replace individualised ones. In the Press Release for "Trade Show"  an exhibition she recently co-curated with Gavin Wade they clearly stated their interest of entering a discussion about economics:

‘Trade Show’ is a group exhibition that exercises the function of art to exchange, present and enact different economic practices and cultures of trade. Over the last decades artists have claimed and reclaimed trade as a socio-cultural space by producing their own shops, swaps, stalls, deals, exchange centres and distribution systems.In ‘Trade Show’ art and trade exist as universal activities deeply embedded in almost everything we do. Art proposes and enacts forms of trade that remind us of the possibilities and complexities of living in a society where everything must mean something, and everything must be worth something. ‘Trade Show’ contributes to a strong trading culture where roles are changeable, economies are collaborative and the imperative of a not-only-for-profit ethos prevails."

This extends into her current project as part of Myvillages, 'Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks' which is being developed in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham and aims to bring the many different aspects of drinks production back into a locally embedded and connected chain of production. Through her commission for Market Town Kathrin will continue to investigate the economy as a familiar and everyday realm that we are all part off, and which is not only used for commercial but also for social and cultural exchange.

http://andmillionsandmillions.net/

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Book Tickets

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November 2015

Shouting Quietly: Workshop for Creatives & Independents

November 2015

Shouting Quietly: Workshop for Creatives & Independents

Join us for an interactive workshop specially designed to help makers, creative, and independent businesses connect more effectively with their customers.

Click to read more

Join us for an interactive workshop specially designed to help makers, creative, and independent businesses connect more effectively with their customers.

The workshop will be led by Pete Mosley, Loughborough-based creative business coach and mentor, and author of The Art of Shouting Quietly: Self-Promotion for Introverts and Other Quiet Souls. Under Pete’s expert guidance you will find an individual voice that will raise your profile, enhance your web presence, improve your use of social media, and help you better communicate your unique stories to your customers.You will create a personalised plan that you can put into action immediately.

With refreshments provided and a chance to socialize and network with other like-minded individuals, this workshop presents a fantastic opportunity to think about your profile and leave with new ideas – just in time for the busiest sales time of the year!

Event schedule:

17.30 - 18.00       Arrive and socialise

18.00 - 19.00       Illustrated talk ‘Shouting Quietly’ and Q&A

19.00 - 20.00       Create action plan with Pete's guidance

20.00 - 20.30       Socialise and close

This event is part of Market Town, a series of new commissions and critical debate that sets out to re-imagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets led by Radar, LU Arts and Charnwood Arts, in partnership with Love Loughborough and Charnwood borough Council. The programme is supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

About Pete Mosley
Pete Mosley delivers talks and workshops on confidence, creativity, and business for corporate clients, universities, creative and cultural organisations, and individuals.He writes and blogs extensively about inspirational thinking, entrepreneurialism, and creativity and creates content for a wide range of magazines, websites, and webinars in the UK and overseas. The thinking behind Pete’s talks, publications and workshops is built on 30 years of face-to-face coaching, training and problem-solving sessions with a wide range of successful people. Pete has simply observed what works – and what doesn’t – and distilled it into sensible, realistic advice. It’s all based on real conversations with real people confronting life’s thornier issues – people just like you.

About The Refectory Table
This event has been curated for us by The Refectory Table. Based in Loughborough, created and run by Janet Currie, The Refectory Table offers inspirational creative business courses, workshops and events for makers, artists and independent businesses. Knowing how forgettable some courses can be Janet set out to create events tailored especially for small groups. These are held in interesting and relaxed spaces where it’s easier to think creatively, with the time and support you need to explore your own path for development, boost your confidence and find a fresh way of thinking about the way you work. Add in superb delivery and good food shared with like-minded people and you have a memorable and far longer lasting experience. 

http://shoutingquietly.com/profile

http://www.therefectorytable.com

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October 2015

Cheap Thrills! Zero Budget Film Festival

October 2015

Cheap Thrills! Zero Budget Film Festival

Join us for this free day of film screenings and workshops, and make your Halloween weekend frightfully fun!

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Join us for this free day of film screenings and workshops, and make your Halloween weekend frightfully fun!

You’ll be on the edge of your seat as the Cheap Thrills! Zero Budget Film Festival celebrates its third year in Loughborough with this special Halloween taster of all things film-related. This event will be stuffed with opportunities to not only see films being screened, but also have a go at making them yourself! Why not come along and…

-  Brave our green screen to star in our Halloween movie!

-  Learn techniques and use our equipment to make 2D animation the old-fashioned way!

-  Create your own film using stop motion, live action, green screen, and editing software!

-  Enjoy the best films from previous festivals in our cosy pop-up cinema!

-  Discover how to get the most of your camera or phone as filmmaking equipment!

All events are completely free to attend, but some of the animation and filmmaking workshops have been made available for pre-booking:

Click here to book for the tabletop filmmaking workshops

Click here to book for the 2D animation workshops

About the Cheap Thrills! Zero Budget Film Festival

After getting started in 2011, the festival has grown year on year and attracted entries from across the world as well as showcasing local talent. It now operates annually in both Sheffield and Loughborough, offering two fantastic chances for filmmakers and audiences to celebrate their mutual love of film. The festival shows the work of professional and amateur filmmakers of all ages side-by-side. Free to attend and free to enter, the only rule is that the films must be less than 8 minutes long, entertaining, family friendly, and have cost little or nothing to make. With refreshments, live interval music, and passionate staff, these events provide an escape from big budget mainstream entertainment, where accessibility and getting involved are the name of the game. The next Loughborough festival will be taking place in spring 2016.

http://www.zerobudgetfilmfest.com/

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October 2015

The Loogabaroogarian's Guide to the Future

October 2015

The Loogabaroogarian's Guide to the Future

What will your town look like in 50 years, or 100? Join us for a day of zine-making and publish your visions for the future of Loughborough!

Click to read more

'Zine' = a DIY, self-published magazine

What will your town look like in 50 years, or 100? Join us for a day of zine-making and publish your visions for the future of Loughborough!

With poet and digital artist Nathan Jones and illustrator Sam Skinner from arts collective Mercy, imagine what Loughborough will be like in the year 2288. Where do people live? How do they get around? What does the town look like? Then, use writing, drawing, and photomontage to imagine how real locations in the town centre would look and function in a cultural tourist guide for the future

Will the future of Loughborough be marvellous or monstrous? You decide…

This event is free to attend and all materials will be provided. It is designed for young people aged 12-15 and parents are welcome to accompany, but will not need a ticket to do so.

http://www.mercyonline.co.uk

http://samskinner.net

The Loogabaroogarian's Guide to the Future represents a collaboration between Market Town and the Loogabarooga Festival. It is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough. The Loogabarooga Festival is an exciting new annual event celebrating illustrated children's literature. Held in Loughborough from 22nd - 26th October 2015, the festival will build on the town's history as the original producer of the world-famous Ladybird Books.

http://www.goleicestershire.com/Loughborough/loogabarooga.aspx

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October 2015

Perimeter Perambulations

October 2015

Perimeter Perambulations

Part walk, part survey, part conversation, the tour will explore boundaries between natural and artificial spaces, exotic and native species.

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Take part in an interactive tour of Queens Park, examining the entry points, thresholds and borders of this maintained natural environment.

Join artist Helen Stratford to explore Queens Park through the eyes of Urban Botanists and other experts. 

In the context of masterplan proposals for the area it will question ideas of connectedness and how you sense the park as part of the town.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Image credit: Flora and Fauna Tours, developed by Helen Stratford.
Photo credit: Nick Cheek

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October 2015

Fruit Routes Exchange

October 2015

Fruit Routes Exchange

Drop by this barter market, and pick up locally grown and produced fruit and preserves for free! Learn about the food grown right here in Loughborough, and ‘pay’ for your edible goods with thoughts, stories, or produce of your own.

Click to read more

Friday 16th and Saturday 17th October, 10am-5pm.

Drop by this barter market, run by Fruit Routes and Transition Loughborough, and pick up locally grown and produced fruit and preserves FOR FREE! Learn about the food grown right here in Loughborough, and ‘pay’ for your edible goods with:

- Locally grown and foraged produce

- Jams

- Ideas

- Recipes

- Jellies

- Thoughts

- Fruit leathers

- Preserves

- Information

- Chutney

- Stories

SPECIAL GUEST: On Saturday morning come and get your apples identified by Steve Roam from People’s Trust for Endangered Species (PTES). What varieties are hiding in your garden?

Fruit Routes is creating an edible campus working with students, staff and local people in Loughborough. This project is supported by the Sustainability Team at Loughborough University and co-ordinated by Anne-Marie Culhane. Fruit Routes Exchange is part of a series of Fruit Routes harvest events - for more information check them out on Twitter at @fruitroutes, call Anne-Marie on 07849 073394, or visit:

https://fruitroutesloughborough.wordpress.com/

Transition Loughborough is a community group aiming to provide local and appropriate solutions to the problems we face due to climate change.

http://transitionloughborough.wordpress.com/

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October 2015

How to Run a Co-op

October 2015

How to Run a Co-op

Join us for an evening dedicated to de-mystifying and explaining different options of organising co-operatives and social enterprises, with talks from CASE and Footprint Workers' Co-operative.

Click to read more

Join us for an evening dedicated to de-mystifying and explaining different options of organising co-operatives and social enterprises. We will be hearing from:


CASE:
 a workers co-operative based in Leicester that delivers advice and support to enterprises that are people-centred, accountable and ethical.

Footprint Workers' Co-operative: a small ecologically minded printers based in Leeds that is also a member of Radical Routes, a network of radical co-ops whose members are committed to working for positive social change.

These talks will be followed by Q&A sessions in smaller groups.

Image courtesy of Harry Pope via Flickr

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September 2015

Identity, Civic Pride and Civic Place

September 2015

Identity, Civic Pride and Civic Place

Come along to this talk to hear about how the role of identity is key to defining a place. A free event and all welcome but booking is required.

Click to read more

This seminar will discuss the possibilities design offers in developing an identity, structure and meaning for a place.  We have invited individuals whose practice is engaged with ideas around how design can creatively connect with communities to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces, developing a sense of pride and purpose. The speakers will be:

Robert Harland

Robert is Lecturer in Visual Communication (Graphic Design) at the School of the Arts, English and Drama, Loughborough University. He spent 15 years working as a graphic designer in London before entering academia, where his research focuses on the relationship between graphic design and urban design. He holds an undergraduate degree in Information Graphics and a PhD in Architecture (Social Sciences).

Robert's presentation will focus on way places function through urban graphic objects. This will emphasise what he calls the mesographic domain, where form and context are at their most affective.

Patrick Lacey, Åbäke

Åbäke is a collective of four graphic designers. Patrick Lacey is from the UK, Kajsa Stahl from Sweden, Benjamin Reichen and Maki Suzuki from France who decided to work together in the summer of 2000.Their physical work includes posters, CD and record designs, furniture, and installations in art galleries and public spaces. Much of their work concentrates on the social aspect of design and the strength that collaboration can bring to a project. Events often involve (in no particular order) film, dancing, eating and cooking and teaching. They are also singers, painters, photographers, members of bands, furniture designers, curators, fashion designers, DJs and teachers.

 In 2004 Åbäke started a collaboration with the association The Friends of Arnold Circus that develops the public space around Arnold Circus in east London. Patrick will talk about a recent history of Arnold Circus told through shirts and posters (2006–2014) 

Robert Sollis, Europa

Europa is a graphic design partnership formed in 2007 and based in London. It is run by Mia Frostner, who is Swedish, and Robert Sollis, who is English. The pair met in 2005 whilst studying at the Royal College of Art in London. For the past eight years Europa have been designing books, publications, signage and graphic identities for clients who are operating predominately in the public or cultural sector. These clients have included institutions such as Tate Modern, Royal College of Art, Architecture Foundation, Greater London Authority, Somerset House and Victoria & Albert Museum, artists such as Ryan Gander, Martin Beck and Alice Channer and architects such as DK-CM and We Made That.

Europa’s talk will be in two parts. First they will present a reading of Loughborough from the point of view of the graphic design tourist. Second they will discuss examples of their work which relate to identity and place.

Finn Williams, Common Office

Finn Williams is an architect-turned-planner based in London. He worked for the Office of Metropolitan Architecture, General Public Agency, and Croydon Council’s Placemaking team before joining the Greater London Authority, where he is Regeneration Area Manager for North West London. Finn is the founder of NOVUS, a public sector planning thinktank, and Common Office, a platform for independent research on the built environment. He also teaches at the Royal College of Art, Bartlett School of Architecture and Central Saint Martins. He is currently developing a new social enterprise to embed talented young designers within public authorities.

Finn will talk about the image of Croydon, and the five years he spent there working with its people and places.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Image courtesy of Brian Negus via Flickr

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September 2015

MapYourMarket

September 2015

MapYourMarket

You're invited to take an exploratory trip to the market and, equipped with GPS recording device, to document your experience - whatever that may be. This workshop is designed for you to share your local knowledge.

Click to read more

Join digital artist Lara Salinas to collaboratively visualise the rhythms of Loughborough market.

You’re invited to take an exploratory trip to the market and, equipped with a GPS recording device, to document your experience – whatever that may be.

Throughout the day we’ll gather your stories, hand-drawn maps and multimedia documentation and share them across social media using the hashtag #MapYourMarket.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Image courtesy of William Murphy via Flickr

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September 2015

Show Me How - Ethical Jewellery & DIY Household Products

September 2015

Show Me How - Ethical Jewellery & DIY Household Products

Join us for the final Show Me How session as we create jewellery from recycled bicycle parts and household products from natural, everyday ingredients.

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Back by popular demand, Show Me How returns for one final practical making session!

Join us for the last of the Show Me How making sessions initiated by artist Ania Bas to explore the value of local manufacturing, sharing, co-working, and co-operation. As we wave a sad goodbye to the project, we will be running an evening of not one but two practical making sessions, led by local makers and accompanied by refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working.

These sessions represent the culmination of the knowledge and skills sharing that has been taking place throughout the project, as participants from previous sessions now become the teachers and step forward to share their own skills.

Session One: make an accessory or piece of jewellery with Mariana Rubino, the creative mind behind the ethical jewellery and accessories brand Beauty in Obsolescence, which strives to find new uses for 'obsolete' materials, thereby minimising their impact on the environment.

Session Two: make household products out of natural, everyday ingredients with Emma Ward, a single mum and part-time postgraduate student in Linguistics, who creates inexpensive natural alternative to chemical-filled, expensive commercial products.

Each session will last an hour, and both are FREE to attend.

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August 2015

Play Loughborough

August 2015

Play Loughborough

Who owns this town? People of Loughborough, you are invited to a day of public game-jamming on the topics closest to your heart. Saturday 22 August between 10am and 5pm. All welcome, gamers and non-gamers alike!

Click to read more

Create online games for the wellbeing and prosperity of everyone in Loughborough… or to start a total catastrophe… It’s your choice.

Artist Ruth Catlow, who co-devised the Play Your Place concept, will lead the day and help the imaginative citizens of Loughborough to develop a collective vision for a richer, emancipated life for the town.

Open to all, no booking required – just drop in.

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August 2015

Show Me How - Basic Silversmithing

August 2015

Show Me How - Basic Silversmithing

Learn the basics of silversmithing with Hannah Smith.

Click to read more

The session will involve making a ring from slim silver wire which will involve sawing, filing, shaping metal, soldering, and hammering, plus a demonstration in melting metal. 

Find out more about workshop leader Hannah Smith.

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 30 June: Crochet and Craft Activism, led by Sarah Green

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

Book Tickets

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July 2015

Show Me How - Basic Woodworking

July 2015

Show Me How - Basic Woodworking

Join Peter Leadbeater for an introduction to basic woodwork. During the workshop you will learn the basic use of wood working tools in the construction of a bird box which you will be able to take home and keep.

Click to read more

Find out more about workshop leader Peter Leadbeater.

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 30 June: Crochet and Craft Activism, led by Sarah Green

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access.  

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

Book Tickets

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July 2015

Why Run a Co-op

July 2015

Why Run a Co-op

Join us for a discussion evening bringing together individuals who work as part of three different national co-operatives – an independent cinema, a print house and a local media co-operative.

Click to read more

Join us for a discussion evening bringing together individuals who work as part of three different national co-operatives – an independent cinema, a print house and a local media co-operative.

Throughout the evening you will hear from:

- Ilana from Star and Shadow, a cinema in Newcastle run entirely by volunteers offering a truly independent programme of inspirational and inspired films. 

- Clare from Footprint Workers, a small ecologically minded printers based in Leeds.

- Alec from Bristol Cable who are redefining local journalism through challenging multimedia, community action and cooperative ownership.

It will be a chance to hear about their experiences as well as ask questions of being part of co-op structure: the complexities of it, the practicalities of it, the ethos and the vision.

This talk is part of the project Show Me How, an opportunity for sharing and learning useful skills. Show Me How is an exploration of the possibility of a culture of shared knowledge and resources. The project is initiated by artist Ania Bas.

This talk is FREE to attend but booking is required.

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July 2015

The New Maker Economy

July 2015

The New Maker Economy

Join us as we discuss the exciting economic and creative potential of makerspaces, fab labs, and community workshops with four key people writing about and working in the field.

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As the growth of makerspaces, fab labs, and community workshops continues we ask what opportunities could they hold for Loughborough and how could they support the town’s economic sustainability?

Recognised as sites of civic and social innovation, creativity and learning, makerspaces are increasingly seen as an exciting opportunity to support design, entrepreneurship, fabrication, manufacturing and technological innovation.

Key people writing about and working in this field will share their thoughts and ideas. The speakers will be:

- Andrew Sleigh: Researcher, writer and producer and one of the researchers on NESTA’s recent UK makerspaces mapping project.

- Caroline Chapain: Lecturer at the Department of Entrepreneurship and Local Economy at Birmingham University.

- Hannah Fox: Development Manager, Derby Silk Mill.

- STEALTH.unlimited: A practice exploring the responsibilities and capacities of architecture in contemporary societies.

This talk is FREE to attend but booking is required.

Book Tickets

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July 2015

Show Me How - Functional Pottery

July 2015

Show Me How - Functional Pottery

Have you always wanted to have a go at making a functional piece of pottery? Maybe a bowl that you can eat your breakfast from? Or a plate for a slice of cake?

Click to read more

Local potter Jo Keogh will demonstrate a range of simple techniques. Why not come and try your hand at making your own pot? No experience is needed and if you like what you have made it can be fired and glazed for you.

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 30 June: Crochet and Craft Activism, led by Sarah Green

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

Book Tickets

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July 2015

Show Me How for Families

July 2015

Show Me How for Families

Would you like to learn new making skills together with your family? Market Town presents Show Me How for Families - a series of practical making sessions tailored specifically for families and led by local makers.

Click to read more

These Show Me How for Families sessions are an opportunity for children and young people to learn new making and craft skills with the help of their parent(s), guardian or carer.

Crochet for Beginners

led by Sarah Green

Learn the foundation chain, which you need for every crochet pattern, and apply it to your first crochet project.

10am - 11am OR 11.30am - 12.30pm

An Introduction to Marquetry 

led by David Towers 

The session will introduce an easy to learn basic technique you can build on in the future to create your own woodwork designs. 

10am - 11am OR 11.30am - 12.30pm

Make a Xylophone

led by James Woodcock

Use copper tubing, wood off-cuts and other everyday materials to make and tune a simple xylophone.

1.30pm - 4pm (breaks included)

Functional Pottery 

led by Jo Koegh 

A range of simple techniques will be demonstrated for you to then test out together and have a go at making a function piece of pottery. 

1.30pm - 2.30pm OR 3pm - 4pm

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Spaces on the sessions are limited to a maximum of five families per session. We are unable to take booking from just adults wishing to attend.

Some sessions will involve the use of tools. It's the accompanying parent(s), guardian or carer to decide what they are happy for their children to undertake. Guidance and further information will be available on the day.

Show Me How is part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to re-imagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Image: courtesy of Jubilee Arts Archive, The Black Country

Book Tickets

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June 2015

Show Me How - Craft & Activism

June 2015

Show Me How - Craft & Activism

A Craft and Activism session with Sarah Green. Plarnbombing a street near you!

Click to read more

Please bring some plastic carrier bags with you as the session will involve plastic yarn (plarn).

Find out more about workshop leader Sarah Green 

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

Book Tickets

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June 2015

Show Me How - Upcycling & Re-using

June 2015

Show Me How - Upcycling & Re-using

Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty SawandSo

Click to read more

You can bring your own items of old and pre-loved clothing but there will be fabrics and clothing available too.

Find out more about Crafty Sew&So.

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 30 June: Crochet and Craft Activism, led by Sarah Green

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

Book Tickets

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June 2015

Show Me How - Repurposing Materials

June 2015

Show Me How - Repurposing Materials

Join James Woodcock to learn simple design and making techniques to turn spare materials into useful objects.

Click to read more

Please bring some materials along with you for this session - spare items that you have in your home or workplace ie tin cans, plastic water pipes, thin chain, plastic washing line, wood dowels, some small bolts and screws.

Guidelines for the items:

- they should be made of a single material (i.e. a broom handle not a television)

- must be clean and dry

- if it's a small item like a tin, then ideally several of them

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access.

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 30 June: Crochet and Craft Activism, led by Sarah Green

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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