**POSTPONED** Symposium - Kantor and his influence

Sat 28 April, 10:00am - 5:00pm

Venue: Martin Hall

Free

***PLEASE  NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED***

Due to unforeseen circumstances we have had to postpone this event until later in the year. Please keep checking our website for announcements on a new date. We are sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment caused.

The work of the Polish artist and director, Tadeusz Kantor, frequently challenged the nature of the object, whether through surreal détournement of the function of a thing, or the bizarre fusion of the performer and the object into a hybrid, struggling identity, striving for new forms of expression, Kantor was haunted by the idea of the possible ‘liveness’ of materials.

This symposium aims to respond to the work of contemporary artists, commissioned by Radar, who are also responding to Kantor, through particular relationships to things, sites, museums and galleries. How might Kantor’s culturally specific ‘poor object’ find itself transformed across decades into a new Europe and a new media age?

Including guest speakers on Kantor and contemporary art practice and panel discussions on objects, Kantor’s history and performance practices (from actors, artists and academics), the symposium offers an opportunity to discuss the legacy of Kantor and the impact of object-based practice today.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Dan Watt, Loughborough
Dan Watt is Programme Director for Drama at Loughborough University. He gained his PhD from Sussex in 2003, where his thesis explored fragmentary writing in the work of Maurice Blanchot, Samuel Beckett and J.M. Coetzee. He joined Loughborough in 2006. His research interests include philosophical and literary influences on theatre and performance in the twentieth century, specifically in the work of Tadeusz Kantor, and his research includes investigating the nature of abject objects.

Dr Richard Allen, Worcester
Richard Allen is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at the University of Worcester. He graduated from Wimbledon College of Art with an MA in Visual Performance (2008) and a PhD in Performance Practice from Aberystwyth University (2014). His work investigates the agency and theatricality of objects through the making of performances, films, essays and publications, including writings about the bio-objects of Kantor.

Noel Witts, Professor of Performing Arts
Noel Witts was born in Swansea and did a degree in English at the University of Leeds, where his theatrical interest started. For the last 10 years he has been busy developing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the Performing Arts at a variety of UK universities. He has developed international contacts for young theatre practitioners in Poland, Romania, Armenia, and other European countries and is interested in the theatre of Kantor.

Dr Klara Kemp-Welch, Courtauld Institute
Klara Kemp-Welch is Lecturer in 20th-century Modernism at the Courtauld Institute. Klara Kemp-Welch was educated at University College London and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (BA French and Art History, 1999; MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, 2001; PhD History of Art, 2008). She has published writings about Kantor, and her next book, Networking the Bloc: International Relations and Experimental Art in Eastern Europe 1968-1989, will be published in 2018.

Dr Martin Leach, DMU
Martin Leech is Senior Lecturer in Dance at DMU. Martin’s first degree was in English and Drama at the University of Hull. After graduation he won a Polish Government scholarship to study theatre directing in Poland from 1982–1983. He recently successfully completed his PhD thesis, a philosophical study of Kantor: ‘Even the thing I am …’: Tadeusz Kantor and the Poetics of Being.

Mike Cooter, Artist
Artist Mike Cooter  has  lectured  widely,  written  on  the  history  of  exhibitions  and  recently  completed a PhD at Goldsmiths, London. His current exhibition The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe at New Walk Walk Museum, Leicester (commissioned by Radar) explores the role of objects through the Museum's collection and is inspired by Kantor's work. His work investigates  the  structural  agency  of  objects,  be  they  sculpture,  cinematic  props or other anthropological artefacts - objects co-opted or created to drive narratives, fictional or otherwise.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

Lee performance.jpg

June 2018

Making it up: This moment of June by Rebecca Lee

June 2018

Making it up: This moment of June by Rebecca Lee

Click to read more

Book here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/rebecca-lee-making-it-up-this-moment-of-june-tickets-46146922688?aff=es2

Drawing on academic research from across the Social Sciences at Loughborough, Making it up: this moment of June investigates forms and relations of listening that (re)produce and are (re)produced by personal and public places, focusing on the interactions that might support people to perform music but are not in themselves musical.

Rebecca has brought together an ensemble of Loughborough musicians to reflect on these ideas and together they will trace boundaries of music, place and registers of listening, exploring how these might be brought within a performance. A public recording session will share the results, which will then re-sound in a playback programme on our Loughborough campus and in the town over the summer period.

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Book Tickets

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June 2018

Disturbing Space by Xana

June 2018

Disturbing Space by Xana

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Disturbing Space is a radio station and sound system on a custom bicycle which answers to no body, place or time. The bicycle, "Soon Reach" was developed by sound artist Xana in response to a series of workshops in Loughborough, Leicester and London around the themes of connecting through sound, displaced geographies and building free spaces to manifest joy.

Disturbing Space reflects on the power of pirate radio, textile printing and songs about movement, lullabies, rhymes and tales which elevate Black voices; creating a journey that is chosen by the traveller and fuelled by music.

"Soon Reach" will be pedalled through Loughborough and passers by are invited to meet with the station and contribute to the broadcast. Exact location details will be added here closer to the date. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Deparment of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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