**POSTPONED** Symposium - Kantor and his influence

Sat 28 April, 10:00am - 5:00pm

Venue: Martin Hall

Free

***PLEASE  NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED***

Due to unforeseen circumstances we have had to postpone this event until later in the year. Please keep checking our website for announcements on a new date. We are sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment caused.

The work of the Polish artist and director, Tadeusz Kantor, frequently challenged the nature of the object, whether through surreal détournement of the function of a thing, or the bizarre fusion of the performer and the object into a hybrid, struggling identity, striving for new forms of expression, Kantor was haunted by the idea of the possible ‘liveness’ of materials.

This symposium aims to respond to the work of contemporary artists, commissioned by Radar, who are also responding to Kantor, through particular relationships to things, sites, museums and galleries. How might Kantor’s culturally specific ‘poor object’ find itself transformed across decades into a new Europe and a new media age?

Including guest speakers on Kantor and contemporary art practice and panel discussions on objects, Kantor’s history and performance practices (from actors, artists and academics), the symposium offers an opportunity to discuss the legacy of Kantor and the impact of object-based practice today.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Dan Watt, Loughborough
Dan Watt is Programme Director for Drama at Loughborough University. He gained his PhD from Sussex in 2003, where his thesis explored fragmentary writing in the work of Maurice Blanchot, Samuel Beckett and J.M. Coetzee. He joined Loughborough in 2006. His research interests include philosophical and literary influences on theatre and performance in the twentieth century, specifically in the work of Tadeusz Kantor, and his research includes investigating the nature of abject objects.

Dr Richard Allen, Worcester
Richard Allen is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at the University of Worcester. He graduated from Wimbledon College of Art with an MA in Visual Performance (2008) and a PhD in Performance Practice from Aberystwyth University (2014). His work investigates the agency and theatricality of objects through the making of performances, films, essays and publications, including writings about the bio-objects of Kantor.

Noel Witts, Professor of Performing Arts
Noel Witts was born in Swansea and did a degree in English at the University of Leeds, where his theatrical interest started. For the last 10 years he has been busy developing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the Performing Arts at a variety of UK universities. He has developed international contacts for young theatre practitioners in Poland, Romania, Armenia, and other European countries and is interested in the theatre of Kantor.

Dr Klara Kemp-Welch, Courtauld Institute
Klara Kemp-Welch is Lecturer in 20th-century Modernism at the Courtauld Institute. Klara Kemp-Welch was educated at University College London and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (BA French and Art History, 1999; MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, 2001; PhD History of Art, 2008). She has published writings about Kantor, and her next book, Networking the Bloc: International Relations and Experimental Art in Eastern Europe 1968-1989, will be published in 2018.

Dr Martin Leach, DMU
Martin Leech is Senior Lecturer in Dance at DMU. Martin’s first degree was in English and Drama at the University of Hull. After graduation he won a Polish Government scholarship to study theatre directing in Poland from 1982–1983. He recently successfully completed his PhD thesis, a philosophical study of Kantor: ‘Even the thing I am …’: Tadeusz Kantor and the Poetics of Being.

Mike Cooter, Artist
Artist Mike Cooter  has  lectured  widely,  written  on  the  history  of  exhibitions  and  recently  completed a PhD at Goldsmiths, London. His current exhibition The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe at New Walk Walk Museum, Leicester (commissioned by Radar) explores the role of objects through the Museum's collection and is inspired by Kantor's work. His work investigates  the  structural  agency  of  objects,  be  they  sculpture,  cinematic  props or other anthropological artefacts - objects co-opted or created to drive narratives, fictional or otherwise.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

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October 2018

Fruit Routes walk with Anne Marie-Culhane

October 2018

Fruit Routes walk with Anne Marie-Culhane

You are invited to join Anne-Marie Culhane for an informal conversation as we walk around the University's Fruit Route. This is a chance to share thoughts on some of the themes and ideas that motivate and inspire Fruit Routes.

Click to read more

You are invited to join Anne-Marie Culhane for an informal conversation as we walk around the University's Fruit Route (approx 1km) from 4.30-5.30pm. This is a chance to share thoughts on some of the themes and ideas that motivate and inspire Fruit Routes; and to find out a bit more about the project.

We'll meet at the Barefoot Orchard, (the weather station opposite Pilkington Library) at 4.30pm. For those who would like to come to the 'Designing Climate Futures' panel discussion afterwards (see below link) we will go on to Martin Hall where there will be free refreshments provided. Anne-Marie's fellow panellists Joanna Boehnert and Bianca Elzenbaumer will also be joining us for the walk.

All are welcome; the route has flat paths (though not tarmac), and is wheelchair accessible.

FRUIT ROUTES is an award-winning project to create an edible campus at Loughborough University through planting of fruit and nut trees, foraging edible plants, and co-creative an edible food culture with students, staff and local people.

ANNE MARIE-CULHANE is an artist whose work across a number of forms seeks to catalyse collective organisation to reduce the harm being inflicted on the planet, to increase understanding of our place in the world, and to bring to life positive visions now and for the future. She works closely with the University’s Sustainability team as the founder of Fruit Routes.
https://www.amculhane.co.uk/

Designing Climate Futures is a discussion event exploring the role of design in movements for ecological justice within and beyond our warming world: https://www.facebook.com/events/297320200856502/

Book Tickets

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October 2018

Designing for Climate Futures

October 2018

Designing for Climate Futures

This conversation brings together three practitioners to explore what roles design might play in collective responses to climate change

Click to read more

This conversation brings together three practitioners to explore what roles design might play in collective responses to climate change. Taking in a variety of methods, approaches and forms of design - from permaculture to architectural design; from transition design to design fictions - it will explore design as a tool for collective organisation. What can design do in the here-and-now of our warming world? What might design do in a more ecologically just world? And how might it help us get from here to there?

There'll be plenty of chance for the audience to ask questions and there will be free refreshments and snacks.

PANELLISTS

JOANNA BOEHNERT is an environmental communicator, designer and educator. She’s a Lecturer in Design and the Creative Industries at Loughborough University and is the founding director of EcoLabs, a studio visualising complex environmental issues. Her book Design, Ecology, Politics: Towards the Ecocene was published by Bloomsbury earlier this year, and has been praised as ‘a must-read for everyone interested in design, ecology, communication and politics.’
https://ecolabsblog.com/

ANNE MARIE-CULHANE is an artist whose work across a number of forms seeks to catalyse collective organisation to reduce the harm being inflicted on the planet, to increase understanding of our place in the world, and to bring to life positive visions now and for the future. She works closely with the University’s Sustainability team as the founder of Fruit Routes, a project that saw the planting of fruit, nut trees and edible plants along footpaths and cycle paths across the university campus. It creates a spring snowfall of blossom and an autumnal abundance of fresh fruits and berries for harvesting, foraging, eating and distributing.
https://www.amculhane.co.uk/

BIANCA ELZENBAUMER combines design research methods with critical approaches to education, conflict mediation and DIY making to explore how designers can contribute to create ecologically and socially just economies. Together with Fabio Franz she founded ‘Brave New Alps’, who have instigated a number of acclaimed projects that instigate, as well as explore, alternative ways of organising our lives. These have involved collaborative working with refugees, workers’ rights groups, artists and place-based communities. Bianca is also a lecturer at Leeds Art University. http://www.brave-new-alps.com/

The conversation will be chaired by DAVID BELL, Radar’s Programme Co-Ordinator. He is also a member of Out of the Woods, a writing collective exploring the forms of sociality and struggle required to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.

This event is part of the annual Fruit Routes Harvest programme, organised by the Sustainability team at Loughborough University. Across the 19th and 20th of October there are a number of events taking place on campus. For more information please visit http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/sustainability/biodiversity/fruit-route/.

Book Tickets

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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