A Creative Workshop (For Adults) By Alison Mott

Wed 24 May, 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Venue: Charnwood Museum, Loughborough LE11 3DZ

Free

Book Tickets

As part of this season's Radar programme For & Against; Art, Politics and the Pamphlet, local writer and historian Alison Mott will lead a FREE creative workshop.

The 19th century Luddite movement has become synonymous with the idea of political protest and the attack on John Heathcoat's lace factory in June 1816 is no exception. But was the 'Loughborough Job' prompted by political unrest or business jealousy? This session will look at the facts surrounding the event and use them as a stimulus for new pieces of writing.

Join us!

(Simply book your free place through Eventbrite)

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February 2018

Talk - The missing; memory, migration and Partition

February 2018

Talk - The missing; memory, migration and Partition

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Join us for an afternoon of discussion to mark the launch of the new project Migrant memory and the post-colonial imagination: British Asian memory, identity and community after Partition, led by Professor Emily Keightley and funded by the Leverhulme Trust. This event is organised in collaboration with Radar, Loughborough University’s Contemporary Art programme commissioning artists to respond to academic research. A panel of invited artists and academics will reflect on their own research and creative practice in response to the project’s main themes: Partition, diaspora and memory. The session will be followed by a drinks reception. 


Panel:

- Dawinder Bansal - Creative Producer

- Kazi Ruksana Begum - Arts Development Officer at London Borough of Tower Hamlets

- Prof Raminder Kaur Kahlon - Professor of Anthropology & Cultural Studies (University of Sussex)

- Prof Emily Keightley - Professor of Media and Memory Studies (Loughborough University)

- Dr Churnjeet Mahn - Chancellor’s Fellow and Senior Lecturer in English Literature (University of Strathclyde)

- Kevin Ryan - Director, Charnwood Arts

- Dr Pippa Virdee - Senior Lecturer in Modern South Asian History (De Montfort University)

 

Book Tickets

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February 2018

Talk - Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

February 2018

Talk - Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

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There are a myriad of forces at work that prevent, enable and force movement. Borders prevent freedom of movement between states. Police and private security regulate movement through social space. Social housing tenants are forcibly relocated as areas are gentrified. Such issues disproportionately affect black people. Yet being made to move is not always a negative phenomenon; and a number of black musicians and artists have explored the role that music can play in creating times and spaces of collective empowerment to subvert, resist and overcome these power structures.

With contributions from musicians, artists and academics, this event explores the relationships between blackness, music, and the (in)ability to move. What is the relationship between grime and social housing? What does it mean when songs can cross borders but people can’t? How might music work within, against, and beyond a world in which free movement is denied to so many?

Image: Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills

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March 2018

Talk - Kelly Large

March 2018

Talk - Kelly Large

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During this talk artist and curator Kelly Large will explore ways to work in certain spaces with objects, images, film and videos, sharing examples from the speaker’s professional experience as well as examples of other artists and curators. This session is designed for students but all are welcome.

Kelly's multi-disciplinary practice engages with acts of public appearance and the agency attached to ‘being visible’; especially how different registers of visibility and public-ness are entangled with the social relations of art practice and its presentation. In both her artistic and curatorial practices she explores these ideas through producing and commissioning live work that uses forms of social choreography to reconsider the relationship between individual and collective agency. In her talk she will discuss the complexities of commissioning live and site specific works in public and private contexts. 

Currently she works as an independent curator and a tutor on the Curating Contemporary Art programme at Royal College of Art. Between 2013–2016 she was Curator: Public Programme at Zabludowicz Collection where she produced performances by Helen Benigson, Martin Creed, Alexandre da Cunha, Andy Holden, Raúl de Nieves, Jack Tan and Katrina Palmer, and worked with Rachel Maclean, Heather Phillipson, Jon Rafman and Ryan Trecartin amongst others.  Recent projects include Empathy Flows, an evening of spoken word exploring the promotion and consumption of emotion with newly commissioned work by artists and poets and Fictions Are Realities To Come, a series of new performances intersecting real and virtual worlds.

Prior to this Kelly directed SUNDAY, an international art fair for young commercial galleries, held annually in London. As part of this role she initiated SUNDAY School, a series of event based artist commissions that explored the convivial nature of the art fair context. 

Her work has been presented at Tate Modern, David Roberts Art Foundation, 52nd Venice Biennale, Eastside Projects, Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art, and MIMA.

Image credit:Raúl De Nieves, Los oceano son la carne, 2014. Photo: Ollie Hammick

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March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

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Drawing on the invitation to reconsider the works of Tadeusz Kantor and intervene in the expansive collections administered by Leicester City Council, Mike Cooter’s onsite research continues for an exhibition to be hosted by the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery in spring. Forming part of the Radar series of commissions The Object is Alive, The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe, will draw on Kantor’s Anti-Exhibition (1963) and Leicester-born naturalist Henry Walter Bates’ (1825-92) research into a form of mimicry that would take his name. Working across holdings from fine art, natural history, industrial design, decorative arts and material cultures, the exhibition will look to explore how the objects in the collection both perform and reproduce themselves through their own agency and in symbiotic relationship with organisations that host them.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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