Identity, Civic Pride and Civic Place

Wed 30 September, 6:30pm - 9:30pm

Venue: The Swan in the Rushes, 21 The Rushes

FREE

Book Tickets

This seminar will discuss the possibilities design offers in developing an identity, structure and meaning for a place.  We have invited individuals whose practice is engaged with ideas around how design can creatively connect with communities to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces, developing a sense of pride and purpose. The speakers will be:

Robert Harland

Robert is Lecturer in Visual Communication (Graphic Design) at the School of the Arts, English and Drama, Loughborough University. He spent 15 years working as a graphic designer in London before entering academia, where his research focuses on the relationship between graphic design and urban design. He holds an undergraduate degree in Information Graphics and a PhD in Architecture (Social Sciences).

Robert's presentation will focus on way places function through urban graphic objects. This will emphasise what he calls the mesographic domain, where form and context are at their most affective.

Patrick Lacey, Åbäke

Åbäke is a collective of four graphic designers. Patrick Lacey is from the UK, Kajsa Stahl from Sweden, Benjamin Reichen and Maki Suzuki from France who decided to work together in the summer of 2000.Their physical work includes posters, CD and record designs, furniture, and installations in art galleries and public spaces. Much of their work concentrates on the social aspect of design and the strength that collaboration can bring to a project. Events often involve (in no particular order) film, dancing, eating and cooking and teaching. They are also singers, painters, photographers, members of bands, furniture designers, curators, fashion designers, DJs and teachers.

 In 2004 Åbäke started a collaboration with the association The Friends of Arnold Circus that develops the public space around Arnold Circus in east London. Patrick will talk about a recent history of Arnold Circus told through shirts and posters (2006–2014) 

Robert Sollis, Europa

Europa is a graphic design partnership formed in 2007 and based in London. It is run by Mia Frostner, who is Swedish, and Robert Sollis, who is English. The pair met in 2005 whilst studying at the Royal College of Art in London. For the past eight years Europa have been designing books, publications, signage and graphic identities for clients who are operating predominately in the public or cultural sector. These clients have included institutions such as Tate Modern, Royal College of Art, Architecture Foundation, Greater London Authority, Somerset House and Victoria & Albert Museum, artists such as Ryan Gander, Martin Beck and Alice Channer and architects such as DK-CM and We Made That.

Europa’s talk will be in two parts. First they will present a reading of Loughborough from the point of view of the graphic design tourist. Second they will discuss examples of their work which relate to identity and place.

Finn Williams, Common Office

Finn Williams is an architect-turned-planner based in London. He worked for the Office of Metropolitan Architecture, General Public Agency, and Croydon Council’s Placemaking team before joining the Greater London Authority, where he is Regeneration Area Manager for North West London. Finn is the founder of NOVUS, a public sector planning thinktank, and Common Office, a platform for independent research on the built environment. He also teaches at the Royal College of Art, Bartlett School of Architecture and Central Saint Martins. He is currently developing a new social enterprise to embed talented young designers within public authorities.

Finn will talk about the image of Croydon, and the five years he spent there working with its people and places.

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

Image courtesy of Brian Negus via Flickr

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October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

An audio-visual installation at Loughborough's Carillon by artist Sam Belinfante as part of Radar's (re)composition project.

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Sat 27 & Sun 28 October, 11am-4pm
Fri 2, Sat 3 and Sun 4 November, 11am-4pm

Artist talk: Fri 2 November, 12.30pm
FREE - no booking required

Recorded in Loughborough’s Carillon over the course of a weekend, Sam Belinfante’s audio-visual installation considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing; a resonant issue for thinking through and about sound as a medium. 

Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay that touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. The work documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration. 

Installed in the ground floor of the Carillon tower, in a space ordinarily used to display objects from the Carillon Museum collection, the film celebrates small acts of care while reflecting on the impossibility of reversing material entropy. Whilst the Carillon is an enduring musical symbol of Loughborough, Belinfante’s approach eschews more obvious explorations of identity for a quiet meditation on the caring processes that are integral to all musical performances, instruments and the maintenance of a place’s identity. Sound, curation and performance intertwine in a struggle of preservation and de-composition. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Photo: Sam Belinfante at the Carillon, credit Benjamin Warner

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November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

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This talk accompanies the audio visualation at the Carillon in Queens Park, Loughborough. 

Sam Belinfante’s audiovisual work considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing. Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay which touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. It documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration.

If you would like to attend the installation event you can find out more HERE

External Link

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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