Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

Thu 19 April, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Venue: Martin Hall Theatre, Loughborough University

Free

BOOK FREE TICKET

With Evan Ifekoya, Xana, Majd Alsaif, Richard Bramwell and James Esson.

There are a myriad of forces at work that prevent, enable and force movement. Borders prevent freedom of movement between states. Police and private security regulate movement through social space. Social housing tenants are forcibly relocated as areas are gentrified. Such issues disproportionately affect black people. Yet being made to move is not always a negative phenomenon; and a number of black musicians and artists have explored the role that music can play in creating times and spaces of collective empowerment to subvert, resist and overcome these power structures.

Through live performance and discussion, this event will explore the relationships between blackness, music, and the (in)ability to move. What is the relationship between grime and social housing? What does it mean when songs can cross borders but people can’t? How might music work within, against, and beyond a world in which free movement is denied to so many?

A panel conversation will feature all participants and the audience. Evan Ifekoya and Xana will also be performing:

Evan Ifekoya - This Catalogue of Poses, Scenario One: At the Ice Box
A radio play exploring the daily lives of four figures in a photograph, some of whom are more alive than others. Beginning at a spectral house club night in London, the characters dialogue as if inhabiting the past, present and future simultaneously. Drawing on the emotional charge of music, the work evokes image through textures of sound, fragments of conversation, reflections and memories.

Xana - Movement in Minus
a sonic loop exploration into the frequencies of pirate radio and how it is used to instil longevity within black and poc communities.

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EVAN IFEKOYA investigates the possibility of an erotic and poetic occupation using film, performative writing and sound, focused on co- authored, intimate forms of knowledge production and the radical potential of spectacle. Their ongoing project ‘A Score, A Groove, A Phantom’ explores archives of blackness, sociality and inheritance as they diffract through queer nightlife and trauma in the present moment. Most recently their work has been propelled by exploring the relationship between a Buddhist practice, speculative fiction, and the echo as affective encounter. Ifekoya’s recent work has been presented at: Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh, Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridgeshire; New Art Exchange, Nottingham (2017); Transmission Gallery, Glasgow; Serpentine Galleries, London; and Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town (2016). Recent performances have taken place at ICA, London and KW institute, Berlin (2017) and Jerwood Space, London and Whitstable Biennial (2016). Ifekoya was an Art Foundation Fellow in Live Art for 2017. 

XANA is a live loop musician, sound designer, composer and poet - often working collaboratively with other artists, researchers, theatre practitioners and filmmakers. In particular Xana is passionate about working with young people, devising creative workshops, encouraging the engagement of others with music, and broadcast technology. They are an organiser of Afrotech Festival; a recipient of Spitalfields Music Open Call funding award; and an artist in residence at Tate Modern and Tate Britain, where they devise workshops for young people. Xana’s interests include archives as places of active memory and future building; sound in architecture; data and its impact on local communities and stories around transhumanism. 

JAMES ESSON is a Lecturer in Human Geography at Loughborough University. His research is broadly located within the field of development geography, and contributes to debates in geography and the wider social sciences by examining development processes in relation to three areas: 1) Unconventional approaches to development 2) International Migration 3) Urban Dynamics. He is Co-Chair of Loughborough University’s BME Staff Network and heads the RGS-IBF RACE Working Group’s Learning and Teaching subcommittee. 

RICHARD BRAMWELL is a Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University. His current research explores the performance of alternative identities through rap; examining the role that hip hop and grime play in a variety of institutional contexts. These include prisons, youth centres, and an arts charity. He is interested in the impact that rap has had on organisations wholly or partially funded by local or national government; the role that the state plays in fostering Britain's rap cultures through these organisations; and how young people perform their identities and represent their communities through rap. 

MAJD ALSAIF is a BSc Media, Culture and Society student at Loughborough University. She is on the committee of Loughborough University’s Ethnic Minorities Network, has been involved with a number of musical events in Loughborough, and is interested in issues around race, gender and social justice. She is working with Evan on a broader project for Radar

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The event forms part of (re)composition, Radar’s commissioning programme for 2017/18. Traversing geographies real and imagined, this explores how music makes place and places make music. Featuring contributions from artists, musicians, researchers, and members of Loughborough’s music communities, (re)composition consists of a lively programme of artists’ commissions, performances, compositions, workshops, film screenings and public discussions. Commissioned artists are Sam Belinfante, Evan Ifekoya, Rebecca Lee and Xana. 

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Radar is Loughborough University’s contemporary arts organisation, which commissions contemporary art projects that work with, contribute to and draw from research undertaken across Loughborough University’s two campuses.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills

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March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

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Radar has invited artist Mike Cooter to actively engage with New Walk Museum’s collection, taking inspiration from the work of Polish artist and theatre maker Tadeusz Kantor, whose work was concerned with the role and status of the object. The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe, will draw on Kantor’s Anti-Exhibition (1963) and Leicester-born naturalist Henry Walter Bates’ (1825 -92) research into a form of mimicry that would take his name. Working across holdings from fine art, natural history, industrial design, decorative arts and material cultures, the exhibition will look to explore how the objects in the collection both perform and reproduce themselves through their own agency and in symbiotic relationship with organisations that host them.

Kantor has been extensively researched by Dr Dan Watt, Senior Lecturer in Drama, Loughborough University. The exhibition is part of a wider programme, entitled ‘The Object is Alive’, that has invited artists to develop new exhibitions in response to the work of Kantor and their own interest in the agency of the object. The exhibition will be accompanied by a major symposium on the influence of Kantor taking place at Loughborough University on the 28th April 2018.

Associated Events

Symposium - Kantor and his influence
Saturday 28th April, 10am-5pm
Martin Hall, Loughborough University
Free / Ticketed
More information & bookings

Exhibition Walk-Through with Mike Cooter
Saturday 5th May, 2pm
New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, 53 New Walk, Leicester, LE1 7EA
Free / Ticketed
Artist Mike Cooter will guide you through his exhibition, introducing his thinking and the works themselves.
To book, please click here

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April 2018

Talk - Vikki Jessop

April 2018

Talk - Vikki Jessop

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Vikki will give a talk about ways in which different artworks can be installed in different places. She will share examples of best practice including how to plan and prepare for such work.  In this talk Vikki will share her own professional experience as well as examples from others. This session is designed for students but all are welcome.

Vikki Jessop currently works in the Department of Ancient Egypt & Sudan at the British Museum. After finishing her A-Levels, Vikki’s career in the arts began by volunteering in galleries and museums across Birmingham and Liverpool, she then undertook an apprenticeship at Ikon, Birmingham.

Following this she moved to London to work at Whitechapel Gallery with Rachel Whiteread on her permanent site-specific commission for the building.

Vikki then joined the V&A’s technical services team, whilst still working at Whitechapel Gallery as a Duty Manager and installation technician. Within a year of being at the V&A, Vikki was appointed Head Technician for the Disobedient Objects exhibition which opened in 2014. Alongside work at the V&A, Vikki has also freelanced for several galleries across the UK and also worked on mount- making for Banksy’s 2015 Dismaland project.

 

 

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April 2018

Symposium - Kantor and his influence

April 2018

Symposium - Kantor and his influence

Click to read more

***PLEASE  NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED***

One of the speakers has had to withdraw from the symposium and combined with a low number of advance bookings we have decided to postpone this event until later in the year. Please keep checking our website for announcements on a new date. We are sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment caused.

The work of the Polish artist and director, Tadeusz Kantor, frequently challenged the nature of the object, whether through surreal détournement of the function of a thing, or the bizarre fusion of the performer and the object into a hybrid, struggling identity, striving for new forms of expression, Kantor was haunted by the idea of the possible ‘liveness’ of materials.

This symposium aims to respond to the work of contemporary artists, commissioned by Radar, who are also responding to Kantor, through particular relationships to things, sites, museums and galleries. How might Kantor’s culturally specific ‘poor object’ find itself transformed across decades into a new Europe and a new media age?

Including guest speakers on Kantor and contemporary art practice and panel discussions on objects, Kantor’s history and performance practices (from actors, artists and academics), the symposium offers an opportunity to discuss the legacy of Kantor and the impact of object-based practice today.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Dan Watt, Loughborough
Dan Watt is Programme Director for Drama at Loughborough University. He gained his PhD from Sussex in 2003, where his thesis explored fragmentary writing in the work of Maurice Blanchot, Samuel Beckett and J.M. Coetzee. He joined Loughborough in 2006. His research interests include philosophical and literary influences on theatre and performance in the twentieth century, specifically in the work of Tadeusz Kantor, and his research includes investigating the nature of abject objects.

Dr Richard Allen, Worcester
Richard Allen is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at the University of Worcester. He graduated from Wimbledon College of Art with an MA in Visual Performance (2008) and a PhD in Performance Practice from Aberystwyth University (2014). His work investigates the agency and theatricality of objects through the making of performances, films, essays and publications, including writings about the bio-objects of Kantor.

Noel Witts, Professor of Performing Arts
Noel Witts was born in Swansea and did a degree in English at the University of Leeds, where his theatrical interest started. For the last 10 years he has been busy developing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the Performing Arts at a variety of UK universities. He has developed international contacts for young theatre practitioners in Poland, Romania, Armenia, and other European countries and is interested in the theatre of Kantor.

Dr Klara Kemp-Welch, Courtauld Institute
Klara Kemp-Welch is Lecturer in 20th-century Modernism at the Courtauld Institute. Klara Kemp-Welch was educated at University College London and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (BA French and Art History, 1999; MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, 2001; PhD History of Art, 2008). She has published writings about Kantor, and her next book, Networking the Bloc: International Relations and Experimental Art in Eastern Europe 1968-1989, will be published in 2018.

Dr Martin Leach, DMU
Martin Leech is Senior Lecturer in Dance at DMU. Martin’s first degree was in English and Drama at the University of Hull. After graduation he won a Polish Government scholarship to study theatre directing in Poland from 1982–1983. He recently successfully completed his PhD thesis, a philosophical study of Kantor: ‘Even the thing I am …’: Tadeusz Kantor and the Poetics of Being.

Mike Cooter, Artist
Artist Mike Cooter  has  lectured  widely,  written  on  the  history  of  exhibitions  and  recently  completed a PhD at Goldsmiths, London. His current exhibition The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe at New Walk Walk Museum, Leicester (commissioned by Radar) explores the role of objects through the Museum's collection and is inspired by Kantor's work. His work investigates  the  structural  agency  of  objects,  be  they  sculpture,  cinematic  props or other anthropological artefacts - objects co-opted or created to drive narratives, fictional or otherwise.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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