Show Me How - Craft & Activism

Tue 30 June, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Venue: Organ Grinder Pub, 4 Woodgate, Loughborough, LE11 2YT

Book Tickets

Please bring some plastic carrier bags with you as the session will involve plastic yarn (plarn).

Find out more about workshop leader Sarah Green 

Part of a series of Show Me How – Hands on craft/making sessions running throughout June, July and August. These sessions are a great way to learn how to make things, meet other people and talk about the value of practical skills.

Each workshop will include a practical session led by a local maker, refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working. 

The sessions are FREE to attend and unless stated otherwise, all materials will be provided. 

The full programme of sessions: 

Tuesday 9 June: Turn spare materials into useful objects led by James Woodcock

Tuesday 23 June: Upcycling and re-using fabrics from your wardrobe, led by Sarah from Crafty Sew&So

Tuesday 14 July – Functional Pottery led by Jo Keogh

Tuesday 28 July – Construct a birdbox with Peter Leadbeater

Tuesday 4 August – Basic Silversmithing with Hannah Smith

You can come to one, or more, or all of the sessions but capacity is limited so booking is essential. 

Show Me How is a project devised by the artist Ania Bas and delivered as part of Market Town, a programme of commissions and critical debate that sets out to reimagine the future of Loughborough’s high streets.

Please note: the Organ Grinder Pub has no disabled access. 

Illustration: Concept by Ania Bas, drawing by Amy Pennington; Co-learning, commissioned by WZB in Berlin, 2014

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October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

An audio-visual installation at Loughborough's Carillon by artist Sam Belinfante as part of Radar's (re)composition project.

Click to read more

Sat 27 & Sun 28 October, 11am-4pm
Fri 2, Sat 3 and Sun 4 November, 11am-4pm

Artist talk: Fri 2 November, 12.30pm
FREE - no booking required

Recorded in Loughborough’s Carillon over the course of a weekend, Sam Belinfante’s audio-visual installation considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing; a resonant issue for thinking through and about sound as a medium. 

Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay that touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. The work documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration. 

Installed in the ground floor of the Carillon tower, in a space ordinarily used to display objects from the Carillon Museum collection, the film celebrates small acts of care while reflecting on the impossibility of reversing material entropy. Whilst the Carillon is an enduring musical symbol of Loughborough, Belinfante’s approach eschews more obvious explorations of identity for a quiet meditation on the caring processes that are integral to all musical performances, instruments and the maintenance of a place’s identity. Sound, curation and performance intertwine in a struggle of preservation and de-composition. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Photo: Sam Belinfante at the Carillon, credit Benjamin Warner

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November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

Click to read more

This talk accompanies the audio visualation at the Carillon in Queens Park, Loughborough. 

Sam Belinfante’s audiovisual work considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing. Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay which touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. It documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration.

If you would like to attend the installation event you can find out more HERE

External Link

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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