Show Me How - Ethical Jewellery & DIY Household Products

Thu 17 September, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Venue: Market Town Corner

FREE

Book Tickets

Back by popular demand, Show Me How returns for one final practical making session!

Join us for the last of the Show Me How making sessions initiated by artist Ania Bas to explore the value of local manufacturing, sharing, co-working, and co-operation. As we wave a sad goodbye to the project, we will be running an evening of not one but two practical making sessions, led by local makers and accompanied by refreshments and the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues around making and co-working.

These sessions represent the culmination of the knowledge and skills sharing that has been taking place throughout the project, as participants from previous sessions now become the teachers and step forward to share their own skills.

Session One: make an accessory or piece of jewellery with Mariana Rubino, the creative mind behind the ethical jewellery and accessories brand Beauty in Obsolescence, which strives to find new uses for 'obsolete' materials, thereby minimising their impact on the environment.

Session Two: make household products out of natural, everyday ingredients with Emma Ward, a single mum and part-time postgraduate student in Linguistics, who creates inexpensive natural alternative to chemical-filled, expensive commercial products.

Each session will last an hour, and both are FREE to attend.

Installation view They bow. Curtain. No applause., 2017, Spike Island, Bristol. Photo Stuart Whipps.jpg

February 2018

Artist Talk: Giles Round

February 2018

Artist Talk: Giles Round

Click to read more

Giles Round is an artist operating across a variety of disciplines including architecture, ceramics, design, print and typography. He engages with materials, processes and collaborators to address the relationship between art, design and functionality. As such the work is populated with citation and misappropriation of an extensive catalogue of collated references. Round’s recent exhibition They bow. Curtain. No applause. at Spike Island in Bristol drew on his professional experience as an exhibition designer to theatricalise the standard systems of display employed by galleries and museums. 

This talk will focus on the making of three recent exhibitions through the roles of artist, curator and designer. 

Recent exhibitions include They bow. Curtain. No applause., Spike Island, Bristol, 2017 (solo); We live in the office, RIBA, London, 2016 (solo); Design Work Leisure, part of ‘Underline’ series, Art on the Underground, London; Ljubljana, 1955, 31st Biennial of Graphic Arts, Galerija Jakopič, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2015 (solo); AGAIN! SORRY! AGAIN! SORRY!, YOUNG TEAM, London, 2015 (solo); Commons Room, Grizedale Arts at Anyang Public Art Project Biennial, Anyang, South Korea, 2014.

Image: Installation view for They bow. Curtain. No applause., 2017, Spike Island, Bristol. Photo by Stuart Whipps.

External Link

Raúl de Nieves 2014.jpg

March 2018

Artist Talk: Kelly Large

March 2018

Artist Talk: Kelly Large

Click to read more

Kelly Large’s multi-disciplinary practice engages with acts of public appearance and the agency attached to ‘being visible’; especially how different registers of visibility and public-ness are entangled with the social relations of art practice and its presentation. In both her artistic and curatorial practices she explores these ideas through producing and commissioning live work that uses forms of social choreography to reconsider the relationship between individual and collective agency. In her talk she will discuss the complexities of commissioning live and site specific works in public and private contexts.

Kelly currently works as an independent curator; and as a tutor on the Curating Contemporary Art programme at the Royal College of Art. Between 2013–2016 she was Curator: Public Programme at Zabludowicz Collection, where she produced performances by Helen Benigson, Martin Creed, Alexandre da Cunha, Andy Holden, Raúl de Nieves, Jack Tan and Katrina Palmer; and worked with Rachel Maclean, Heather Phillipson, Jon Rafman and Ryan Trecartin amongst others. Recent projects include Empathy Flows, an evening of spoken word exploring the promotion and consumption of emotion with newly commissioned work by artists and poets; and Fictions Are Realities To Come, a series of new performances intersecting real and virtual worlds.

Her work has been presented at Tate Modern, David Roberts Art Foundation, 52nd Venice Biennale, Eastside Projects, Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art, and MIMA.

Image: Raúl De Nieves, Los oceano son la carne, 2014. Photograph by Ollie Hammick

Mike Cooter Exhibition - Copy.jpg

March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

March 2018

The Object is Alive Exhibition - Mike Cooter - The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe

Click to read more

Radar has invited artist Mike Cooter to actively engage with New Walk Museum’s collection, taking inspiration from the work of Polish artist and theatre maker Tadeusz Kantor, whose work was concerned with the role and status of the object. The Mimic, the Model and the Dupe, will draw on Kantor’s Anti-Exhibition (1963) and Leicester-born naturalist Henry Walter Bates’ (1825 -92) research into a form of mimicry that would take his name. Working across holdings from fine art, natural history, industrial design, decorative arts and material cultures, the exhibition will look to explore how the objects in the collection both perform and reproduce themselves through their own agency and in symbiotic relationship with organisations that host them.

Kantor has been extensively researched by Dr Dan Watt, Senior Lecturer in Drama, Loughborough University. The exhibition is part of a wider programme, entitled ‘The Object is Alive’, that has invited artists to develop new exhibitions in response to the work of Kantor and their own interest in the agency of the object. The exhibition will be accompanied by a major symposium on the influence of Kantor taking place at Loughborough University on the 28th April 2018.

Image: Research photograph (with thanks to Michael Asher), Mike Cooter, 2017. Boiler heating the Abbey Pumping Station, home of Leicester City Council’s Industrial History Museum.

Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills.jpg

April 2018

Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

April 2018

Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance

Click to read more

There are a myriad of forces at work that prevent, enable and force movement. Borders prevent freedom of movement between states. Police and private security regulate movement through social space. Social housing tenants are forcibly relocated as areas are gentrified. Such issues disproportionately affect black people. Yet being made to move is not always a negative phenomenon; and a number of black musicians and artists have explored the role that music can play in creating times and spaces of collective empowerment to subvert, resist and overcome these power structures.

With contributions from musicians, artists and academics, this event explores the relationships between blackness, music, and the (in)ability to move. What is the relationship between grime and social housing? What does it mean when songs can cross borders but people can’t? How might music work within, against, and beyond a world in which free movement is denied to so many?

With Evan Ifekoya, Xana, and James Esson.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, A Score, A Groove, a Phantom, Performance Whitstable Biennale 2016, photo by Bernard G Mills

Search

Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

Join our Mailing List

Facebook

Twitter