The Rise of the Local

Thu 26 November, 6:30pm - 8:30pm

Venue: The Organ Grinder Pub, 4 Wood Gate

FREE

Book Tickets

Our economy is changing. We are looking for alternatives to the accepted capitalist norm. We are exploring new sustainable economic systems that have new values and behaviours. Some have argued that we are seeing the spontaneous rise of collaborative production: goods, services and organisations are appearing that no longer respond to the dictates of the market and the managerial hierarchy. The biggest information product in the world – Wikipedia – is made by volunteers for free, abolishing the encyclopedia business and depriving the advertising industry of an estimated $3bn a year in revenue. Parallel currencies, time banks, cooperatives and self-managed spaces have proliferated, barely noticed by the economics profession, and often as a direct result of the shattering of the old structures in the post-2008 crisis.  For this seminar we have invited individuals involved or interested in new sustainable economies and less recognised modes of economic co-ordination to speak about their work. The speaker at this event will be:

Naomi Diamond

Naomi works for Locality, the national network of ambitious and enterprising community-led organisations, working together to help neighbourhoods thrive. Based in Leicester, she has worked with numerous member organisations and partners in the Midlands supporting the development of viable and sustainable community enterprises, for example wind-farms, housing developments, community farms and other asset developments. For the last three years she managed the national Community Organisers Training Programme and is a strong believer in the power of people to make change happen locally. Before coming to Locality (formerly the Development Trusts Association), Naomi was involved in the local food sector and was a founder member of Leicestershire Food Links, a local food community enterprise running farmers markets and local food projects. She is a Board member of Soft Touch Arts, a  youth arts charity which has recently taken over a vacant City centre building in Leicester and created a £1m Youth Arts and Heritage Centre.

http://locality.org.uk/

David Boyle

David Boyle is the author of Broke: How to Survive the Middle Class Crisis (Foutrh Estate) published 16 Jan 2014.  He was recently the government’s independent reviewer on Barriers to Public Service Choice (the Boyle Review, 2012-13), for the Cabinet Office and Treasury. He was part of the team at the New Economics Foundation which ran the successful ‘Clone Town Britain’ campaign (2004-10), which changed the language and shifted the debate about high streets. He has been at the heart of the effort to develop co-production and introduce time banks to Britain as a critical element of public service reform.  He was co-author of three key reports for NESTA in 2009/10, The Challenge of Co-production, Public Services Inside Out and Right Here, Right Now which set out co-production as a practical way forward for UK services. David is the author of a number of books about history, social change and the future of money.  His book Authenticity: Brands, Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life (Flamingo, 2003) helped put the search for authenticity on the agenda as a social phenomenon.  The Tyranny of Numbers (Flamingo, 2001) and The Sum of Our Discontent (Texere, 2001) predicted the backlash against the government’s target culture.  Funny Money: In search of alternative cash (Flamingo, 1999) launched the time banks movement in the UK.  He was a member of the federal policy committee of the Liberal Democrats (1998-2012).

http://www.david-boyle.co.uk/

Kathrin Böhm

Kathrin Böhm is an artist and founding member of the London-based art and architecture collective public works, and the pan-European artist initiative myvillages.org.  Projects are produced collaboratively and within the public realm. Kathrin is interested in the possible production of public space through art led formats of production and trade, where polarised producer and consumer roles can be interrupted and re-envisaged. She considers economy as a public realm where values are being produced and negotiated, and is particularly interested in collective processes to replace individualised ones. In the Press Release for "Trade Show"  an exhibition she recently co-curated with Gavin Wade they clearly stated their interest of entering a discussion about economics:

‘Trade Show’ is a group exhibition that exercises the function of art to exchange, present and enact different economic practices and cultures of trade. Over the last decades artists have claimed and reclaimed trade as a socio-cultural space by producing their own shops, swaps, stalls, deals, exchange centres and distribution systems.In ‘Trade Show’ art and trade exist as universal activities deeply embedded in almost everything we do. Art proposes and enacts forms of trade that remind us of the possibilities and complexities of living in a society where everything must mean something, and everything must be worth something. ‘Trade Show’ contributes to a strong trading culture where roles are changeable, economies are collaborative and the imperative of a not-only-for-profit ethos prevails."

This extends into her current project as part of Myvillages, 'Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks' which is being developed in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham and aims to bring the many different aspects of drinks production back into a locally embedded and connected chain of production. Through her commission for Market Town Kathrin will continue to investigate the economy as a familiar and everyday realm that we are all part off, and which is not only used for commercial but also for social and cultural exchange.

http://andmillionsandmillions.net/

This is one of a number of workshops/seminars that are being organised as part of the current Market Town programme.  They are intended to further investigate the themes explored in the main commissions, and to further engage the local community in the debate about the future of Loughborough.

IMG_9918_creditBenjaminWarner.jpg

October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

October 2018

Sam Belinfante: To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

An audio-visual installation at Loughborough's Carillon by artist Sam Belinfante as part of Radar's (re)composition project.

Click to read more

Sat 27 & Sun 28 October, 11am-4pm
Fri 2, Sat 3 and Sun 4 November, 11am-4pm

Artist talk: Fri 2 November, 12.30pm
FREE - no booking required

Recorded in Loughborough’s Carillon over the course of a weekend, Sam Belinfante’s audio-visual installation considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing; a resonant issue for thinking through and about sound as a medium. 

Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay that touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. The work documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration. 

Installed in the ground floor of the Carillon tower, in a space ordinarily used to display objects from the Carillon Museum collection, the film celebrates small acts of care while reflecting on the impossibility of reversing material entropy. Whilst the Carillon is an enduring musical symbol of Loughborough, Belinfante’s approach eschews more obvious explorations of identity for a quiet meditation on the caring processes that are integral to all musical performances, instruments and the maintenance of a place’s identity. Sound, curation and performance intertwine in a struggle of preservation and de-composition. 

This event is part of (re)composition, Radar's main commissioning strand for 2017/18, which explores how music makes place and places make music. The project draws on the research of Dr Allan Watson in Loughborough University's Department of Geography, and has expanded to engage with research across the Social Sciences. More information on (re)composition here.

Photo: Sam Belinfante at the Carillon, credit Benjamin Warner

Sam Belinfante.jpg

November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

November 2018

Sam Belinfante: Artist Talk

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This talk accompanies the audio visualation at the Carillon in Queens Park, Loughborough. 

Sam Belinfante’s audiovisual work considers processes of ageing as markers of time passing. Informed by the concept of ‘tintinnabulation’—the lingering sound of a struck bell—it explores the subtle but constant processes of decay which touch the Carillon and the people and objects that coalesce around it. It documents collaborative actions taken to extend the life of the bells, contrasting their quiet dormancy with the bustle of restoration.

If you would like to attend the installation event you can find out more HERE

External Link

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Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

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